The ‘Nappy’ Belts

For the third installment of my observations from the ECF Championships, I wanted to write a quick note about the waist belts the runners were using, as I have noticed a European trend for the belts nicknamed ‘nappy’ belts here in the UK.

These belts are so named because the material on them covers most of your backside and are quite different to the canicross waist belts most of us are used to seeing.

The Non-Stop Comfort belt – an example of one the ‘nappy’ belts available in the UK

The belts are designed to distribute the force of a dog pulling over a wider area, whilst being breathable and comfortable to wear. The leg straps are mandatory as they are part of the distributing factor and are adjustable but most competitors seem to keep them tight.

My biggest concern when I first saw the belt pictured, was the hook sticking out of the front (originally designed for skijor) but this can be turned into less of a straight out line hook by crossing over the legs straps through it, which pulls it down and this is a trick many Europeans use to make their skijor belts multi-purpose.

There were a number of runners using these waist belts throughout the competition and it was whilst chatting to a competitor that I discovered the trick and can now see the appeal of them. They are extremely lightweight yet tough and durable, with no foam or fleece to bulk it out or hold water (or even sweat -yuk!). There are also a number to choose from  and not all of them have the hook for the line.

I have been aware of the belts now for nearly 18 months, as one of our suppliers actually sponsored us with one last year and I like the additional surface area for spreading the pull. Until now I haven’t raced wearing mine but perhaps I should take a leaf out of the European canicrossers’ book and try my next race with a ‘nappy’ belt strapped around my backside!

One of the mass starts from the womens’ race – Photo courtesy of tzruns.com

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s