K9 Trail Time Myth Buster Number 2 – You can’t canicross a dog in a short harness

You can’t canicross your dog in a short harness – Ever heard this one? I’ve seen this comment on a number of groups recently and the irony of this is that 11 years ago when I started canicrossing, everyone was told they could ONLY canicross in a short harness!

At that point there weren’t so many options for a longer style harness and X-Backs were the main design for a long pulling harness, so the theory was at that time, that you shouldn’t canicross in an X-Back because the harness was designed for a low pull point (this much is true) and that when used for canicrossing, the X-Back would lift off the dogs back and cause issues for the dog (never seen this happen). This prompted us to write a blog about why we love the X-Back harness because certain companies and individuals were trying to profit from this false information and we wanted to explain why the X-Back was still a fantastic harness for running dogs in, no matter what the sport…

We love X-Backs (even if Donnie’s face doesn’t say so in this picture!)

https://k9trailtime.wordpress.com/2016/06/21/why-we-love-x-back-harnesses/

So instead of an X-Back, people were suggesting that a ‘H- Back’ Harness (essentially a short harness) was the only option for canicrossers to use safely. We actually started out with shorter style harnesses for this reason and quickly realised that there were pros and cons for both styles of dog sport harnesses and that different dogs suited different things.

The Howling Dog Alaska Distance Harness an example of a ‘H Back’ style

Another typical ‘H Back’ style harness

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

At K9 Trail Time we prefer to use common sense and a knowledge of a dogs anatomy to determine whether a particular style of harness will cause a dog any restrictions to movement, rather than hearsay and the marketing of companies who have a vested interest in persuading you one way or the other about a suitable running harness they manufacture.

There are certainly some short harnesses we would not recommend for canicross and there are many ‘walking’ harnesses which claim to be suitable for canicross but are not in our opinion. Remember what you are looking for in a harness is for it to be non-restrictive and allow your dog to move as freely as possible, so a harness which comes across or covers the shoulders in any significant way, will not be suitable.

Harnesses which restrict shoulder movement are not suitable for canicross

However, we have used a number of different, highly suitable, short harnesses and recommend only harness which we have personally used for the dog sports. It is also worth mentioning at this point that we took all our harnesses to a group of qualified and experienced Canine Massage Guild members and in terms of potential for muscular problems from a badly fitting harness, they preferred the shorter styles of harness on the whole.

The Non-stop Line Harness, one of the selection we have which have been throughly tried and tested by our team!

We do always recommend the shorter harnesses for dogs who are more leisurely pullers and dogs who drop back because sometimes dogs who pull very hard out in front all the time can make a rasping noise in a short harness. This is due to the fact that the pull on a short harness is directed along the top of the harness, which pulls the harness back, sometimes up and if the harness isn’t sitting low enough on the dog, this can mean into the throat. All this depends on your dog and the way the harness fits and I can run 3 of my 4 dogs in a short harness with no problems, however the 4th dog will always make this rasping noise, even when walking!

Even my biggest, most athletic dog can run well in his short harness

So we hope that blog has helped dispel another myth we have seen floating around in groups and reassure those of you who do run your dogs in short harnesses, that you’re not going to do them any harm running them in a shorter style harness.

Happy trails!

K9 Trail Time Myth Buster Number 1 – You have to be super fit to canicross

At K9 Trail Time we often hear the words ‘I’m not fit enough to run with my dog’ and we’d like to dispel that myth and turn it into ‘you will get fit ‘if’ you run with your dog’!

We all have to start somewhere and although you might see plenty of athletic looking people taking part in the sport of canicross, particularly racing, please don’t think that everyone starts off like this. Often it takes a lot of patience, willpower and determination to get fit running with your dog but once you get involved you realise how good it can be for both of you.

In fact many people start off exercising with their dog and go on to enjoy other sports as a result!

A few case studies:

Duncan Wells as he started canicross in the UK

Duncan Wells canicrossing in the French Alps – much fitter after a few years of running with his dogs!

Natti Shaw as she just started canicross, Natti now takes part in OCR races and many other fitness activities but she started with canicross

 

Sarah was also inspired to get fit with her dogs and now runs couch to 5km canicross club runs with her local canicross group

So where do I start?

Couch to 5km

A really good place to start is a simple Couch to 5km programme and we have posted a blog with a couple of options for this here: https://k9trailtime.wordpress.com/2020/07/03/k9-trail-time-basic-couch-to-5km-plan-for-canicross/

There are also apps which can get you motivated such as the NHS one here: https://www.nhs.uk/live-well/exercise/get-running-with-couch-to-5k/

You can also download podcasts to listen to but we personally prefer to canicross without ear phones in as you can hear what’s going on around you.

Canicrossing can be enjoyed just you and your dog, not necessarily with groups or music to spur you on, your dog will do that!

Canicross Groups

You can start a Couch to 5km programme on your own, or get a group of you together to start this, by organising a group you’re more likely to succeed as you hold each other accountable for your progress. Groups can encourage and inspire and we highly recommend trying to find people in your local area to meet up with to get started. You might find that you already have a local group with experienced canicrossers  who can also join in to help with advice on running with your dog and getting the right equipment so you are both comfortable. Often there will be someone who will lead these runs for beginners and this is the perfect place to start.

Having a group to run with can be extremely motivating for both you and your dog

Canicross classes

There are a number of individual trainers, clubs or organisations offering canicross classes now and most of these will focus on getting you started safely with your dog. Our advice with these classes is to investigate your instructor to find out how much canicross experience they have themselves. Some classes are run by personal trainers and some are run by dog trainers, some are run by people who have been canicrossing for years with their own dogs and this is most valuable. In our opinion you need to have some experience of both running AND dogs to be able to teach canicross, as it is a lot more than just going for a run with your dog and your trainer should be able to train both you and your dog in your classes.

Make sure your canicross instructor has had years of training for the specific sport, not just running or dog training

Whatever way you get into it, running with your dog can be a great experience and most people certainly start off in the sport of canicross without having had a running background. If you are one of these people, do not be put off!!! Join the thousands of other people who have begun their canicross journey being unfit and unsure but develop with their dog to increase the fitness and health of both of you, who knows where your journey together might take you!

We hope that has helped dispel the myth that you have to be super fit to run with your dog, you can start anywhere but if you stick with it you will both definitely benefit – Happy trails!

 

K9 Trail Time – Basic ‘Couch to 5km’ Plan for Canicross

There are many ideas and thoughts about getting your dog ready to run your first 5k with you. Not only do you need to build up your ability and strength, but so does your furry friend. Once you have built up the basic fitness with your pooch, the opportunities are endless for you both. Whether you want to be participating in your local parkrun, trekking across forest trails or you fancy joining a club and racing, the first rule to go by is that you should both make sure you are healthy and able to participate in this sort of activity. Your dog should be fully developed before starting canicross and it is always worth getting your dog checked over by the vet to make sure that all general health is good before you head off out on the trails.

Jayne before taking up canicross, walking with her huskies

Jayne after taking up canicross which she followed a Couch to 5km plan for

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Next, you will probably want to invest in a harness for your dog, a belt for yourself and a bungee line to connect you. Most new canicross runners will find that running with their dog in a harness and wearing a waist belt makes the whole experience more relaxing for both participants. If you are local to a canicross club, it is worth popping along to try some kit, or you can contact us at K9 Trail Time for more advice.

Having suitable kit from the start will allow you to enjoy your experience

We have a VBook here which can help determine what harness might be best for your dog: https://bit.ly/howtochooseaharnessvbook

We also have a belt blog here: https://k9trailtime.wordpress.com/2017/07/25/its-all-about-canicross-belts-how-to-choose-and-wear-them/

And a bit on lines here: https://k9trailtime.wordpress.com/2013/06/06/line-length-the-long-and-short-of-it/

There are many different programmes you can search for online and it is important to make sure that you are following one which is suitable for you and your dog. The following programmes have been created using information specifically for dogs who are building up to 5k with their humans.

The first plan is designed for those who have not done much exercise, or for a younger novice dog who you want to build up to running. If your dog is under one year of age please see our puppy training blog for more information on how to start a young dog running.

To go from a non-runner to a canicross runner should be a slow and steady process

The second plan is designed for those whose dogs (and humans) are already out and about walking at least three times a week for around 30-40 minutes at a time.

The programmes are designed for a 12 week commitment, with the flexibility of repeating steps if you need to.

PLAN 1 – THE COMPLETE BEGINNER

Each activity should be completed three times a week (preferably with a rest day in between so you can monitor for injury and allow suitable recovery)

Week Warm Up Steady Jog Walk Repeat Cool Down
1 – 3 times a week do the following (For all weeks do the below) 

 

Brisk walk 1 minute

Jog 1 minute

Brisk walk 1 minute

Jog 1 minute

Brisk walk 1 minute

90 seconds 3 minute 8 times Light stretching and rehydration.

Remember that this should be done gradually. Stretching should not cause discomfort for either party.

 

2 1 minute 2 minutes 9 times
3 2 minutes 2 minutes 9 times
4 3 minutes 2 minutes 6 times
5 4 minutes 2 minutes 6 times
6 5 minutes 1 minute 6 times
7 6 minutes 1 minute 5 times
8 7 minutes 1 minute 4 times
9 8 minutes 1 minute 4 times
10 9 minutes 1 minutes 3 times
11 9 minutes 30 seconds 3 times
12 Steady jog for 30 minutes, either 15 minutes with a 45 second break x2 or straight through if you are both comfortable.

 

PLAN 2 – FOR THOSE WHO ARE MORE ACTIVE AND WALK FOR AROUND 30-40 MINUTES THREE TIMES A WEEK.

This plan is based on distance, it requires a little more communication with your dog and can be measured using a GPS watch, or familiar landmarks. As with the previous plan, this would be more suited to trails and you should avoid running your dog on tarmac and concrete.

Week Warm Up Run / Jog Walk Repeat Cool Down
1 – 3 times a week do the following (For all weeks do the below)  

 

 

Brisk walk 1 minute

Jog 1 minute

Brisk walk 1 minute

Jog 1 minute

Brisk walk 1 minute

½ kilometre 3 minute 4 times  Light stretching and rehydration.

Remember that this should be done gradually. Stretching should not cause discomfort for either party.

2 ½ kilometre 2 minutes 6 times
3 ¾ kilometre 2 minutes 4 times
4 ¾ kilometre 2 minutes 6 times
5 1 kilometre 2 minutes 3 times
6 1 kilometre 1 minute 30 seconds 3 times
7 1 kilometre 2 minute 4 times
8 1 kilometre 1 minute 30 seconds 4 times
9 1 kilometre 2 minute 5 times
10 1 kilometre 1 minutes 30 seconds 5 times
11 1 kilometre 1 minute 5 times
12 Run 5 k – this can be broken into 2 sections with a short walk or slower jog.

 

Remember that these programmes are a way of building up your ability and stamina as a team. In every cool down it is important to keep moving and allow your body (and that of your dog) to cool down slowly. In this period you should stretch and monitor for any signs of discomfort. For your four legged friend you may need to help them to stretch a little too, ask your vet or physio the best way to do this if you are unsure, as they can show you simple ways to do this. It is also recommended that you check between your dog’s pads and if they have long hair, check for tangles, brambles and twigs. This cool down period is also a great way to monitor your dog for injury and cuts as well as any unwanted visitors from your trail run. It helps to build a stronger bond with your dog and make the whole process rewarding.

Once you become a canicrosser, you’ll wonder why it took you so long!

Once you have cooled down, the final stages include; a kit check to make sure there is no damage and everything is clean and dry. This is then followed by your photos and updates so you can share your successes with your friends!

We wish you the best of luck getting started and if you need any help do contact us at info@k9trailtime.com