Tegan’s story – saying goodbye

Whilst not directly related to the dog sports world, saying goodbye to your beloved companion is something we will all have to face at one time or another and I personally wanted to write this blog as a tribute to my princess who I lost last month and who was the reason I started K9 Trail Time.

Tegan was my first dog who I was solely responsible for, I got her after I had finally moved out of home and I will never forget the first time I saw her face. Tegan came from a local rescue kennels and when I saw her she was trying to scale an 8 foot stable wall in her excitement to get out, I should have known then that getting her would change my life.

Tegan the very first time I saw her in kennels

The early days were really hard and I struggled with her separation anxiety, which at times was soul destroying and I felt I was letting her down at every stage. I made so many mistakes and I distinctly remember trying to bike with her on a lead held in my hand which inevitably ended in disaster when she saw a cat and tried to run under my bike! We muddled on and she began to settle with me, taking part in long walks with my horse and managing her anxiety through exercise and training.

Tegan the first night I had her

After nearly a year I had the confidence to introduce another dog to the house and it was then that I realised as much as I exercised them, there was something missing in our lives and I needed to find something for us to do together. We tried both flyball and agility but Tegan was reactive towards other dogs in that situation, so group sessions were not for us and we needed to find something else to focus both Tegan and Judo’s minds on.

Tegan and Judo in the early days

We first discovered canicross through a friend who suggested to us that it was a great way for the dogs to exercise safely and in an environment where people understood and respected some dogs’ need for space. When Judo was old enough we started to train, running locally at first and then taking part in our first race in 2009. From that point on we were hooked! We were lucky to have some very experienced canicrossers who ran a local group and we began to join them on a weekly basis.

Our very first race with CaniX at Stanton Country Park, Swindon on Sun 18th Oct 09.

For the first time Tegan began to really settle in the house and after more than 2 years the destruction resulting from the separation anxiety began to diminish. That’s not to say she stopped this behaviour and right up until the weeks before I had to let her go, she was still ripping up beds and trying to escape out of cages if she felt that she should be with me rather than confined somewhere not taking part!

Tegan even ripped off and got out of a boarded up cat flap twice!

For nearly 10 years we had so many adventures with our canicross friends, we attempted the West Highland Way in Scotland, managing 60 miles in 3 days but having to pull out due to my injury after the 3rd day. It was during the training for this I came up with the basic plan for K9 Trail Time. We did successfully complete the Cotswold Way in 2016 with the 3 dogs I had at that point, each taking legs of the route so they were fresh each day for the next stage. Tegan was aged 9 and so I was especially proud of her completing the distances of up to 15 miles she managed.

One of our biggest achievements was completing the Cotswold Way, Tegan did the last stage with me

Tegan was diagnosed at around 4 years old with arthritis in her fore limb carpal joints, most likely a result of genetics rather than anything else but we managed this for the whole of her life with exercise, the occasional dose of medication and by carefully monitoring her for signs of stiffness or pain which she virtually never displayed. We strongly support Canine Arthritis Management for giving great advice and help for people whose dogs have been diagnosed with arthritis, as it certainly doesn’t mean the end of an active life as Tegan proved.

Tegan had an extremely active life, she took part in canicross, bikejor, scootering and even had a go on a rig

In 2017 during a routine health check the vet mentioned a heart murmur and said not to worry about it, many dogs have a heart murmur and live their whole lives happily with no ill effects. However in 2018 I started to suspect the murmur was having an effect and there were subtle signs of her beginning to slow down. We booked a specialist appointment with a cardiologist and had it confirmed with an echocardiogram that she was indeed suffering with Mitral Valve Disease which is degenerative but can be delayed with medication.

Tegan began to slow down a little in the last couple of years but she was always the first one up for an adventure

From that point on I knew we were on borrowed time, studies indicate that given the correct medication dogs with MMVD can live for years but I had already seen changes in her that made me think we might not get many years. The advice I was given and what I stuck to, was to keep her going and not limit her exercise, if she wanted to run then she should run! Tegan would often need us to wait for her but we always did and she continued to run with us right up until the weekend before she left us. Tegan even raced a short course with CaniX for a night run in January 2019 at 12 years old, she loved every minute and more importantly she was still being allowed to take part, she hated being left out of anything.

Tegan after her night race with me in January, she was always so happy to be out with me

I’m not going to forget that last week we had with her, it was busy as usual and we had an event down in Devon we attended. Tegan had been picky over her food but that wasn’t unusual for a dog who was nicknamed ‘princess’ for a reason. However she did seem more tired than normal and so she had a rest day after we got back. Those last two days were heartbreaking as she went downhill so quickly, she went to the vet as soon as I felt she wasn’t happy and she deteriorated there to the point where I knew she was beginning to suffer.

I knew my time with Tegan was limited but she was such a character right until the end

Tegan had developed an arterial fibrillation, which is a complication with the heart condition and her kidneys were failing but also during investigations the vets found a mass in her intestines and it was then I knew I was going to have to let her go. The decision itself when I looked at her wasn’t difficult as such, because I knew it was the kindest thing for her, but it was one of the hardest things I’ve ever had to do after sharing nearly 12 years of my life with her.

Saying goodbye to Tegan is one of the hardest things I’ve ever had to do

Tegan was such a huge character and was always telling me what she thought, she woke me up every morning at home, she told me off if I hadn’t fed her by a certain time and nearly every group photo I asked her to pose for, she had to tell me to hurry up and let me know she was bored. Tegan was my inspiration for K9 Trail Time, to create a business providing kit and information for active dog owners so that they could enjoy the kind of life we had, to improve the kind of behaviours Tegan had displayed when she was bored and frustrated and giving dogs a channel for this.

Tegan was always shouting at me or someone else to let her opinions be known!

Tegan’s legacy will live on in our hearts, in our home but also in K9 Trail Time, she is the main dog in the logo, the photo taken from one of our early years racing at an event in Scotland just before we attempted the West Highland Way. All we can do for our dogs is give them the best possible life with the time we have and know when to let them go when that time has come. It’s the worst pain ever but knowing you’ve had the best life you can together is some comfort.

Tegan will live on through K9 Trail Time, the company set up was inspired by her

‘Princess’ Tegan you were the dog that changed my life, until I find you again.

Run free princess

 

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Five Top Tips for Trophee des Montagnes: Heather Jenner

K9 Trail Time Team member Heather Jenner has recently come back from the Trophee des Montagnes race series in France and she has written a set of top tips for those thinking of making the trip for next year.

We thought we’d share her top tips as they are useful when considering any challenging race or race series and here in the UK we have our very own new set of canicross specific races that will challenge even the seasoned canicrosser in the Red Kite Event series.

More information can be found about them here: https://www.redkitetrailevents.co.uk/

 

My Five Top Tips for Trophee des Montagnes:

Top tip no 1. ~ Perfect your commands
Most Canicross events in the U.K don’t require a ‘behind’ or ‘with me’ command. This command will save your nerves when the trails get particularly steep. The race organisers allow runners a ‘free dog section’ on some of the stages, here you can unclip and keep your dog at a heel or close by for when you hurtle your way down the more tricky technical sections. If this isn’t an option then a ‘behind’ or ‘with me’ command is required to keep you and your dog safe but still continuing your race pace without mishap. Like all new commands I start training at a walk on the flat, then progress walking down hill, then a jog and so on. Trails which are narrow with high hedgerow either side are best so your dog can’t push past.
Photo – Banjo & I from 2018 descending Etape 4 Allemont
The other command I add into our training is the ‘march’, think of this as an ultra runners hike, where the ascents are extreme and you still need to be moving forward. You want your dog to be driving forward in a purposeful walk/trot which will help your momentum when all you want to do is stop.
Photo – Banjo & I marching up Etape 5 Villard Reculas
Top tip no 2. ~ Acclimatise to warm weather running ☀️
Around Easter when British Summer Time starts warming our days and most U.K. canicrossers hang up their harnesses until September our summer training started. With short speed sessions; 1km reps close to water sources, hill march training on longer hikes and evening woodland free running we were able to prepare ourselves for the warmer temps we’d face in the French Alps. Checking the humidity forecast ruled our training sessions, a few weeks before we travelled it was really hot. I kept the dogs activities to swimming only and went out solo on consecutive days, plus adding in some undulating trail races to test my own fitness & evening canicross events (humidity permitting) which always helps with motivation.
Photo – Milly & I at Gibbet Hill 10km
Top tip no. 3 ~ Budget & planning 📆
As soon as you get your entry confirmed (usually the middle of February) start planning your journey, accommodation preferences, vet visits for vaccines, passports, plus other general admin needed for entry such as racing insurance and medical forms, the Trophee Des Montagnes Live Facebook page & website has all the necessary information.
Getting made redundant in my job played havoc on my finances I gave up numerous races I’d usually schedule into my training. I needed to reduce costs as much as possible to justify getting myself & my dogs to France, I decided to live basic and stay in my van in the runners camps which came with the entry. Using the dog shower camping higher than Snowdon was rather liberating and the views from my van were simply stunning, roughing it wasn’t that bad after all.
Photo – View from my camp spot at Auris
plus I relished the opportunity to make friends with the international community, this was all part of the adventure of the TDM.
 🇬🇧🇫🇷🇧🇪🇸🇪🇩🇪🇮🇹🇺🇸🇨🇭🇭🇺
Top tip no. 4 ~ Mix up your Terrain 👣
Research what the trails will be like on race day and mimic them in your trail schedule, I use this preparation with any major event.

This is also very important for your trainer choice and keeping up with your dogs paw care. I train mainly on the South Downs where we are spoilt with sheep grazed wide grassy tracks. Unable to finance any Wales trips this year, I headed into our neighbouring counties and asked canicrossers to lead me around some new routes which included hard stoney terrain.

Photo – Training with Canicross Sussex near Cissbury Ring
Top tip no. 5 ~ Enjoy it 😊
Enjoy your running, your training, your time away. Enjoy being part of an international Canicross event. Enjoy the escape, the adventure and most importantly the bond you’ll develop with your dogs throughout and the feeling of achievement when you’ve completed one of the worlds most famous Canicross events; The Trophee Des Montagnes. Most importantly don’t forget your flag 😉 Photo – Milly & I finishing Etape 10 2019

Dog walking essentials, how to have the best walks with your dogs

With four dogs here at K9 Trail Time we have plenty of experience of dog walking, as well as the canicross and bikejoring we train for. Over the years we have put together a kit list of our dog walking essentials along with our top tips for enjoying your walks.

Firstly we would always recommend using a harness if your dog is going to be on a lead at any point during your walk. This is not just because it gives you more control over your dog but also because any strain on your dogs’ sensitive neck area can cause muscular issues in the dog without you even realising and in extreme cases has been linked to eye problems in dogs where pressure has been exerted on the neck over prolonged periods of time. We have a huge range of harnesses in our Dog Walking section here:

https://www.k9trailtime.com/shop/other-activities/walking.html?p=1

 

A good fitting walking harness is a must for easy dog walking

Keeping your dog on a lead is sometimes a necessity, around roads, livestock and other dogs who might be nervous are just some of the examples when you will want your dog under more control and a harness is a great way to do this without causing your dog any harm, whilst still allowing them a bit of freedom to get their head down and sniff to their hearts’ content too.

Walking with a harness allows you to retain control over your dog whilst also allowing them freedom to sniff and explore their environment.

The next thing we would suggest is a walking belt for you. Belts are designed to give you your hands free when walking and this comes in handy not only with multiple dogs but even for one dog if you have to stop and pick up dog poop or need to answer a phone call. We have a large range of belts on our website too and many of them have pockets and / or loops to hang useful items from such as poo bags or a water bowl for your dog. If you need any help choosing a belt or a harness then we are always happy to help find something that fits your requirements.

A good walking belt can make life so much easier when on a dog walk, particularly with multiple dogs

The addition of a bungee lead on its’ own can make a huge difference to your dog walks, having a bit of ‘bounce’ in the line means there is less strain on you and your dog if they suddenly pull after something and reduces your chances of injury. We love the Howling Dog Alaska Line for strong pulling dogs:

https://www.k9trailtime.com/shop/other-activities/walking/howling-dog-line.html

and the new Non-stop Touring Lines are also fantastic for dog walking:

https://www.k9trailtime.com/shop/non-stop-touring-lead.html

Adding a bungee line to your dog walking set up can make a huge difference

Bungee lines do mean your dog can get a bit further away from you than with a regular lead, so do be mindful of that when approaching things which you may not want your dog to reach.

We also like to take a handful of treats out with us on every dog walk, we may not necessarily use any of them but the dogs know I have them and so if I need to recall them from something exciting, they are more willing to come back if they know I have something decent to offer them in return! Many dog treats are full of ingredients that act in the same way as sugar and additives do on kids, so we are very careful about what we use and only have high quality meat treats in our cupboards. We have just started to stock a range we have been using for a while, so if you’re looking for good quality dog treats we offer a selection here:

https://www.k9trailtime.com/shop/jrpp-training-treats.html

Good quality training treats are a must for dog walking!

Taking some treats on a dog walk is also a great way to interact positively with your dog, reinforcing your recall and encouraging calm behaviour. It can be very easy to get lost in your own thoughts when out with your dog but dog walking should be fun and rewarding for you both, so practice basic training on walks and use the time to build on that bond you have rather than seeing it as a chore.

Dog walking should be fun and rewarding for all concerned!

Dog walking is a big part of our weekly routine in addition to any dog sport training we do because walking allows your dog to use its’ nose which is highly sensitive and a huge part of the way your dog interprets the world around it. So we make sure the team get a chance to use their noses every day to explore new places. With dog walking being such a big part of our lives, we use the tools listed above to make our walks the best they can be and we hope by sharing these we can help make your dog walks great for you and your dog too.

Happy Trails!

 

K9 Trail Time Interview with an expert – Vickie Pullin, National Champion

We have been covering lots of professions surrounding the dogs sports in our interviews but what about someone who has actually made a profession out of the dog sports themselves? We spoke to Vickie Pullin who runs a business taking people out with her sled dogs to show them how to run dogs safely and teaches people with their own dogs how to get the best out of them.

Vickie spends a lot of time with her dogs in her job, as well as training them for races

Tell our followers a little bit about what you do, how you got into it, how long you have been doing it and your experience / or qualifications?

I run husky tours for the public from my base in Gloucestershire and race my own sprint sled dogs nationally and internationally, with the aim of improving my times and positions in the IFSS (International Federation of Sleddog Sports) World rankings year on year.
I have been running my business, Arctic Quest, for 9 years now and racing seriously with my dogs for 5 years.

Recent results

Winter 2018/19 Results:

British champion in both

  1. Bikejor Women’s Elite Class Open &
  2. 4 Dog Open Class

Runner up in the Open 2 Dog Scooter Class

Gold and Bronze medals in the ICF World Champs plus 4th in the Open Scooter Class

Gold and 2 x Bronze medal in IFSS Euro champs plus 4th in the Open Bikejor Class

WSA World Champs: 4th

IFSS World Champs snow: 12th and 12th Mass start

WSA World Champs snow: 21st (and a comment from the vet: my dogs look in great condition – better than any medal 😉)

In the 2017 / 2018 I was British champion in 3 classes and had 5 top 10 results in the IFSS World Championships, picking up a silver in WSA World championships

https://youtu.be/FFk2PyN1goI

What does a day in the life of you consist of?

5am starts – letting the house dogs out and turning on the coffee machine and lap top… work with breakfast then dogs out and cleaning kennels.
Dog all then loaded up for work in the van and trailer … and down the road we head.
The mornings are spent doing Husky Rides at Croft Farm, we have a blast running dogs, educating people about sprint racing and sharing my life with the public. we meet some amazing people and enjoy food and drink around the campfire.
After the public leave, I train the race dogs, sometimes muscle, interval, speed, or overtaking and this can include coaching with other athletes

Vickie coaches others to race with their dogs in the mono sports of bikejoring and scootering

Back home to let the dogs out have a play and then chill in the kennels – now time to train me… so 1-2 hours either gym, running, biking etc
Then back to play and feed dogs and kennels
Evening is spent either having dogs out in the field, extra training for me, hydro treadmill for the race team or swimming for me and dogs
So normal day consists of DOGS!!!!!
Occasionally there will be a meeting here and there with important people like sponsors, partners, book keeper! We also go into schools, and do some filming and TV work with team so no day is ever the same… then in the winter around a normal day, we have the races…. then it all changes!
We travel around the world racing sprint sled dogs and its the best thing ever!!!!!

Share with us your proudest moment so far

Proudest moment for me is actually owning 29 fit healthy dogs – I try and take a moment everyday to appreciate that.
Everyday is a proud moment!

Vickie has raced both huskies and hounds in Europe on snow

 

We have had some big races and great wins on the last couple of years and thats the icing on the cake to an already amazing team if dogs!

What are your top 3 tips connected with what you do for our followers and their active dogs?

  1. Love your dogs
  2. Have fun always
  3. Enjoy the moment

What are your plans for the future?

Love dogs, race dogs, work with dogs, – repeat! (the same as now!)

Vickie believes the key to success is a great relationship with her dogs

How can our followers get in touch with you?

Facebook: Vickie Pullin (feel free to add and follow us)

Websites:
www.arcticquest.co.uk

Harness fit in a bit more depth

Here at K9 Trail Time we are constantly researching and learning more about dog anatomy and physiology to help us understand the impact working a dog in harness will have on the natural movement of the dog. Part of this study has involved reading the latest research into dog movement undertaken by Dr Martin Fischer in the Jena study and his most recent work which has yet to be published. The findings have been summarised nicely here:

https://www.dogsymposium.nl/professor-dr-martin-fischer/

You might be thinking ‘what has this got to do with me and my dog?’ but we believe that to understand the dogs’ natural motion helps us to understand why a harness may or may not work for your dog based on it’s skeletal structure and how it was designed to move.

The first thing to say is that dogs are designed to move most efficiently in a ‘trotting’ gait and so if your dog is a trotter when they are pulling, they are using their energy efficiently and moving minimally. If your dog is ‘bounding’ when pulling in harness, either in a canter or a gallop (more likely at higher speeds when attached to a bike or scooter but if you run fast enough then canicross too) then your dog is exerting more effort than the efficient trot pace and it is even more important you have the correct fitting harness to ensure they have the freedom of movement necessary so as not to restrict them in any way.

The single biggest problem we see is harnesses which are too big on the dog and so are inadvertently restricting shoulder movement because the neck of the harness is encroaching on the shoulder when the dog moves. It is so important the neck on your sport harness is nice and snug to avoid this restriction but also to avoid your harness slipping up into the armpit of your dog when they might pull to one side and this again then restricts shoulder movement.

Below are 4 pictures of one of the K9 Trail Time dogs, Yogi, in 4 different sizes of the Non-stop Freemotion harness and in all honestly to the untrained eye it might be hard to tell which fits and which doesn’t. From top to bottom Yogi is wearing the size 4 Yellow flash (too small) size 5 Red flash (perfect fit) size 6 Blue flash (too big) and size 7 White flash (far too big).

Now looking at these picture you might think the size 6 is the one which fits Yogi best and we’d agree that based purely on the photos, it does perhaps look like it is sitting in the best place but if you look closely the top of the shoulder is slightly restricted and when slotting your hand in the neck (you can’t tell that from the photo) there is a huge amount of room for the harness to slide around on his neck. The size 4 is obviously too small being too close behind his front legs and the angle is wrong on his ribs. The size 7 is obviously too big, coming too far back on his body and when he pulls into it, the straps on his ribs will come behind the last ribs and pull up into his soft stomach region – not good!

At this point it is also worth saying you cannot always tell correct harness fit from a photo. Yogi is an easier candidate to judge from a photo because he lacks thick fur but even then you can only tell the neck on the size 6 Freemotion was too loose by feeling the gap when it is pulled tight. We see a lot of people asking for advice on social media and lots of people who comment haven’t got the first idea what they are even looking for, let alone have the experience to make a critical evaluation of harness fit based on a couple of photos!

Our advice would be if you’re unsure about your dogs’ harness fit get along to see someone who is experienced with correct harness fit in person and let them have a feel of the harness on your dog and observe how they move in it, this is by far the best way to get proper advice on harness fit. By asking people on social media you risk getting bad advice and ending up with something which could potentially cause your dog damage in the long term.

Another thing to look out for is that your harness is not too long. This doesn’t happen so often with the shorter harnesses although you do have to ensure the harness is not coming back behind the last ribs and pulling up into the stomach area. Again I have used pictures of Yogi below to demonstrate this (because he lacks the thick fur of my others!).

In the first photo the Zero DC Short is too big and is sitting right on the end of his rib cage. When Yogi pulls forward properly in this harness it will come further back still from where it is sitting in the photo and pull up behind his ribs into his stomach. In the second photo the Zero DC Short is much more snugly fitting on his neck and sits better against his ribs, you can still see he has room behind his front legs for movement but because of his (relatively) deep chest compared to his length the harness is sitting further forward on him than it would ideally.

The below photo of Judo shows the Zero DC Short harness as an ideal fit on him and as you can see it sits much further back from the front legs than on Yogi, this is because Judo hasn’t got the deep chest that Yogi has but this harness is still fitting him correctly and not restricting his shoulder by being too big or by coming too far along the ribs and likely to pull into the stomach.

It is most important with the longer harnesses that they are not too long as this can really have an impact on the way your dog moves. With a harness such as an X-Back or even the Zero DC Long you need to be very careful that when the harness is pulled into that it doesn’t extend back beyond the base of the tail. This may mean that when the harness is not being pulled into it looks as if it may be too short. I think this is demonstrated perfectly in the photo below.

Donnie is wearing the Zero DC Cross harness and it’s the correct size for him, however when it’s not being pulled it seems to sit quite far up his back. You can’t really see (the problem with a hairy dog) but it’s sitting perfectly on his neck and has enough clearance behind his front legs so that it will not be restricting front shoulder movement in any way.

You can see from the photo of the harness being pulled that it’s now sitting further back on his body and along the ribs in the correct way. The black webbing straps (not the cord) come to the base of his tail when the harness is pulled and will come back even a fraction more if he were to pull strongly into it, so it is in the correct place for a well fitted x-back harness.

Below is a photo of Donnie in an x-back harness which he used to wear (when he was heavier) and you can see what a harness looks like if it is too long. The length of the side straps mean it’s coming right back onto his hips when it is pulled and this will be even worse when he pulls forward into the harness. The neck on this harness is actually still ok and not causing any restriction to his shoulder but that extra length means the harness will be putting pressure on his hips if he bounds forwards and really pulls into this harness which is not great for his natural movement and could cause him to get sore spots in this area with repeated use.

So hopefully this blog and these photos give you a bit more of an insight into how your dogs’ harness should fit on your dog. We offer a free harness consultation service for our customers and you can either come and see us in person at one of our trade stands or pop up shops listed here:

https://www.facebook.com/pg/K9TrailTime/events

or we do offer an online service for those who can’t make an event. If you are interested then e-mail us at info@k9trailtime.com after answering the questions here:

https://www.k9trailtime.com/information/harness-consultation-questions

If you can get to an event then that is always the best way to get a harness fitted for your dog, however we have successfully fitted thousands of happy, active, dogs with harnesses based on information taken online. So why not get in touch and see what might work best for your dog for the sport you take part in.

Happy trails!

Triathlon for dogs comes to the UK

Triathlon for dogs isn’t something that had been done before Tri Dog set up in the UK in 2016, probably because we have a climate which makes it very difficult to get the timing right for all three disciplines to be participated in at the same event. Traditionally the running and cycling elements of a triathlon are winter sports when dogs are involved, so that the dogs are running in cooler temperatures and are not likely to overheat. Of course this doesn’t relate so well to the open water swimming element and it is something we have considered at great length and have chosen our dates according to balancing these factors.

Choosing the right time of year for the Tri Dog events has been very important

The group of people behind Tri Dog events in the UK have all had a wealth of competitive experience with running and cycling dogs but the swimming is something we have only been doing to maintain fitness in the summer. We have taken inspiration from a competition which has been running in Europe for 8 consecutive years now called ‘Iron Dog’ and using their model we have begun to offer a programme of training and events to develop triathlon for dogs in the UK, mainly based around the Midlands area.

The main elements of a Tri Dog event are:

Canicross:

Running with dogs is now more commonly known as canicross and is defined as cross country running with your dog attached to you. To take part in canicross races, your dog must have a correctly fitting harness and be attached via a bungee lead to a waistbelt worn by the person. Canicross is a fast growing sport in the UK and there have been specific races for people to take part in with their dogs for over 10 years now.

Canicross – running with your dog

Bikejor:

Biking with dogs is known as bikejoring and although originates from the sled dog sports where people used bikes to keep their dogs fit in the spring and autumn when there was no snow for sledding, is now a sport in it’s own right. Riders usually have a mountain bike with an attachment which helps to keep the bungee line from falling in the wheel if the dog stops suddenly and the dog is in harness, attached to the bike via a bungee lead around the headstock of the bike. Bikejor is much faster than canicross and the top dog and rider combinations are reaching speeds of in excess of 30 mph on some of the trails.

Bikejor – biking with your dog

Swimming:

Swimming with dogs hasn’t got a specific name and isn’t yet a recognised sport. For the Tri Dog events being brought to the UK we are requesting that your dog is attached to you via a lead of some description for safety. The idea is to try and get your dog to either swim alongside you in the open water or if you’ve got a really strong swimmer, they can even pull you if they are wearing a comfortable harness.

Swimming with your dog

The Tri Dog series of training and events got underway in October 2016 with the first training weekend which sold out before the event. We welcomed a group of owners and their dogs along to Croft Farm, near Tewkesbury to come and participate in all three disciplines and also practice some vital race skills.

The bikejor group concentrated on bike skills for the people and then once some basic skills were established and practiced, the dogs were brought into the training sessions. Depending on previous experience, some people were tackling a specially designed skills trail and some were getting confidence with their dog being attached to the bike and running out in front.

The canicross group focused on the skills necessary for racing in a triathlon, this is very important when it comes to racing with dogs as you are responsible for your dogs’ behaviour as well as your own! Canicrossers were passing each other side by side and then progressing to head on passes encouraging the dogs to ignore each other and stay calm. Race starts were also practiced and the transitions were explained and then completed by all those taking part. We are using stake out lines to attach the dogs to whilst the owner changes the equipment for each phase, this enables the dog to see the owner at all times but not interfere with any other dog or person, keeping everyone involved separate and safe.

The swimming group worked on getting the dogs confidently into the water and for some this was the first time they had experienced open water swimming with their dogs, so making the process as calm and enjoyable as possible was vital to ensure the dogs (and their owners) would be happy to do this again. For the swimming element of the triathlon, the welfare of the dogs is paramount and we do not encourage owners to force their dogs to swim, with this in mind there is a wade option for those whose dogs are struggling with the swim.

The swim is the part most people worry about

The training weekend was a resounding success and we have already had calls for more training sessions which we are hoping to provide in 2019. We have our next Triathlon event in less than two week now with the biggest entry we’ve seen since we began the events, so it looks like it will be a good one!

If you would like to know more about Tri Dog and for the event and training information please visit the Facebook page Tri Dog and our website http://www.tri-dog.com, we’d love to get more people participating and enjoying this very new combination of dog sports with their beloved pets.

K9 Trail Time interview with an expert – Lisa Baker, Galen Myotherapist

As part of our ‘Interview with an expert’ series we spoke to a number of different therapists who have treated our dogs and the dogs of our friends. Lisa is not based in our area but we know Lisa through the canicross races we attend and many of our friends take their dogs to see Lisa for treatment of soft tissue injuries and maintenance of health in their sport dogs. We hope you enjoy finding out more about Galen Therapy from our interview.

Tell our followers a little bit about what you do, how you got into it, how long you have been doing it and your experience / or qualifications?

I am a qualified and registered Galen Myotherapist, we specialise in targeted soft tissue manipulation, releasing compensatory chronic muscular issues built up from adaptive change due to muscular, orthopaedic or neurological conditions. We use a variety of soft tissue techniques as well as posture and exercise management. A Galen Myotherapist is one of very few canine massage therapists who gain an accredited qualification (Level 3 Diploma) we are required to complete a specific amount of CPD hours per year and belong to governing bodies for therapists including CAAM (Canine Association of Accredited Myotherapists) and IAAT (International Association of Animal Therapists) We work only by Veterinary Referral.

I became a Galen Therapist as I had experienced a worrying episode of my dog suffering with extreme muscle cramps after working him in the shooting field one day, I had no idea how to help him so I attended the Galen Therapy Centre workshop to learn techniques to help my own dog and found out about the Galen Anatomy and Physiology course which I did for two years before qualifying to join the Galen Diploma, I qualified after 3 years and was invited to join the Galen Therapy team. I have been qualified and practising for the last two and a half years and I love every second of it!

Galen Therapist Lisa had vast experience with dogs in general before completing her training

I have an extensive back ground in dogs in general, including being on the Weimaraner Breed Judging List at Open Show level, having passed numerous Kennel Club show judge assessments and exams. I also judge at Gundog Working Tests for HPRs (Hunt, Point, Retrievers) and have passed the Kennel Club Field Trial Judges Assessment and Exam. I have a keen interest in the biomechanics of dogs and know how important good conformation and muscle balance is for the dog to fulfil their job. I have recently taken up Canicross with my own dogs and know how important maintaining their form to be as injury free as possible is. I am keen to help others with the maintenance of their own sporting dogs and have built up a large client base of a variety of Gundogs, Agility and Canicross dogs. I also treat many older dogs suffering from different degenerative diseases including Osteo Arthritis, developing a treatment programme to work along side other modalities keeps the elderly dog maintained and as pain free as possible allowing them to lead a good quality of life.

What does a day in the life of you consist of?

I run my own business (Hampshire Canine Therapy) from home where I have a treatment room and work there from day to day, sometimes I do home visits but once a week I run a clinic in South East London at The Animal Therapy Room with 2 other Galen Myotherapists, where we treat a variety of clients including elderly animals, those who’ve suffered trauma and have become paralysed and those recovering from surgical procedures such as cruciate repair, hip replacements etc. It’s a long, full day in London but all very rewarding!

Lisa sees lot of clients at her clinic in Hampshire

Share with us your proudest moment so far

I don’t have one particular proud moment as I feel proud every time I receive a message from a client telling me how well their dog is doing since I saw them even if it’s when the dog was able to poo in one place! Every small change counts!! but my most proud moments are when I have prepared a dog for competition or a show and hear they have been placed and how well they have performed at that time. It makes all my hard work worth it!

What are your top 3 tips connected with what you do for our followers and their active dogs?

1. Always ensure you warm your dog up and cool them down before and after walks, races or competitions. Cold muscles, tendon and ligaments injure much easier than warm ones! Gentle trotting on lead before allowing them off lead will help or you can attend a Galen Therapy Centre Workshop to learn specific techniques http://www.caninetherapy.co.uk

2. Learn to know the movement of your dog. It’s amazing how many owners don’t notice when their dog is looking uncomfortable and needs some help. If you get to know your dog’s movement, oddities can be picked up and dealt with quickly rather it becoming a chronic problem and taking longer to treat. Don’t wait for your dog to be broken! Find where your nearest Galen Myotherapist is and take your dog for an assessment, they can advise you on any muscular issues your dog may have and along with veterinary consent can treat your dog accordingly. Find your nearest therapist here http://www.caninetherapy.co.uk/contact-us/find-a-practitioner/

3. Ensure you have the correct harness for your dog, whether it be for running or general walking, the dog must have their shoulder completely free of obstruction to enable full length of stride. Wearing an incorrect fitting harness can cause muscular issues and lack of performance. K9 Trail Time can advise on harness fitting and what would suit your dog as all dogs are different and have different needs.

Lisa recommends you warm up your dog before any strenuous physical activity

What are your plans for the future?

As I have loved working with a variety of animals over the last two and a half years and seen many suffering with different conditions, I am now training as an Animal Physiotherapist and along with my Galen Diploma I will be able to offer the best possible care for rehabilitating animals back to health.

I will also be running a variety of muscle conditioning classes for groups of dogs including performance, arthritic and puppies.

How can our followers get in touch with you?

I can be found on Twitter, Facebook and Instagram @hampshirecanine or through my website http://www.hampshirecaninetherapy.co.uk

I am based in Portsmouth, Hampshire but serve neighbouring areas of West Sussex, Surrey and Dorset or if you live in the area of South East London / Kent I’m at The Animal Therapy Room (on Facebook) or email info@animaltherpayroom.co.uk