Hitting the trails – Hiking with your dog (Belts)

We haven’t been doing much canicrossing recently due to the warmer weather, so we’ve been doing a lot more early morning walking instead. Most of the K9 Trail Time team can be let off lead but there are times when they all have to be under control, for example if there are fields with livestock or if we come across a road. It’s at these times when we use slightly different equipment to the canicross kit we usually use, as it’s good to have another style of belt and harness if you want your dog to recognise when you will be walking and when you are canicrossing.

Our walking belts can also be used as canicross belts but for canicross we prefer something with less padding and for walking we prefer the more padded styles, so for regular walking we like the Zero DC canicross belt found here:

https://www.k9trailtime.com/shop/zero-dc-canicross-waist-belt.html

It has a big pocket and the cord on the front means we can easily have 4 separate lines attached, plus the extra padding is useful if they do all decide to pull and leg straps prevent it riding up the body. It comes in a range of colours too.

The Zero DC canicross belt with it’s big pocket, leg straps and cord at the front to attach dogs to, is perfect for walking too

We also like the Dragrattan Simple Canicross Belt which also has a cord at the front, leg straps to keep it in place but no pocket. It’s thick padded waist band should be worn low on the hips and offers great comfort when walking strong dogs:

https://www.k9trailtime.com/shop/dragrattan-canicross-belt.html

The Non-stop Trekking Belt is also a very padded, comfortable belt with leg straps but with a fixed point at the front in case you prefer a little bit of extra control when walking, perhaps not so suitable for multiple dogs but perfect for one or two dogs. It comes in a range of colours.

https://www.k9trailtime.com/shop/non-stop-trekking-waist-belt.html

The Trekking Belt now comes in Navy Blue and Purple as well as plain Black

If leg straps are not your thing then the Neewa Trekking Belt is a great value walking option and has a central webbing strap to keep it in place on your hips plus two straps which meet in the middle to attach your dog/s to. It has slight stretch through these straps as they have an elasticated section and has a decent sized pocket attached to it:

https://www.k9trailtime.com/shop/neewa-trekking-waist-belt.html

We also have the Howling Dog Alaska Trekking Belt which is great if you prefer a very supportive option for a walking belt. The belt has a good sized pocket and a thick webbing strap which adjusts, sliding through the middle and you attach your dog/s to a solid ring stitched into the webbing, which provides a very secure option for attaching dogs to a fixed point in front of you:

https://www.k9trailtime.com/shop/howling-dog-trekking-waist-belt.html

All of the belts we stock provide you with a much better experience for walking dogs than simply holding a lead, as you will have your hands free and will be far more comfortable, especially if your dog pulls. Hands free hiking with your dog is a great way to exercise together without the worry of your dog being loose if there are roads or livestock nearby and you can use it as an opportunity to train your voice commands at a slower speed. Hiking with your dog is also perfect for younger or older dogs who might not be fit for canicross and can give you a similar experience to canicross at a much more sedate pace. You might also enjoy hiking with your dog if you are injured yourself and need to build up strength slowly.

Managing multiple dogs can be tricky without a belt, especially if they pull – Photo courtesy of Simon Warwick

If you have any questions about hiking with your dog please do contact us by e-mailing info@k9trailtime.com – Happy Trails!

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K9 Trail Time Interview with an expert – Laura Hope, Agility Team GB Member

With the European Open Agility Championships being held next weekend (27th – 29th July 2018) we thought we would interview one of Team GB who also happens to be the K9 Trail Time agility trainer too!

Tell our followers a little bit about what you do, how you got into it, how long you have been doing it and your experience / or qualifications?

My name is Laura Hope and I am a qualified paediatric nurse which I’ve practiced for about 13 years. I had my daughter in 2015 and last year decided to take a break from the shift work to be with my daughter. I have been doing Competitive Agility for around 10 years and started my own training business – Clever Little Dog Agility Training up on Cleeve hill in Cheltenham last August. I started Agility with my American Bulldog who qualified us two years in a row to compete at Discover Dogs. I now have x3 beautiful collies. Jade Grade 7 and on Team GB, Rambo Grade 5 and Bonders who is learning the game 🙂. I love the game, it’s so much fun learning and developing with my dogs. Always things to learn and every dog teaches you something new. Great fun.

Laura and her dog, Regalaway Serendipity (Jade)

What does a day in the life of you consist of?

A day in the life of me consists of being woken up by my daughter any time from 0530 🙈🙈. Feed the dogs breakfast around 0630 and get ready for the day. Take grace to nursery and go up to Cleeve. Where I work / spend time with my dogs before I pick grace up at 1300. I do a 4 mile round trip run over Cleeve with the dogs most days – exhausting 😂 and then either do a bit of training or just chill out with them. It’s lovely just spending time with them in the countryside. I train my clients and then go and get my daughter. The afternoon consists of childish things 😂🙈 and then we walk the dogs in the evening. Often I then return to the field to teach some more and then I return home around 2100, to repeat it all again the next day. When I write it down I’m able to reflect on how lucky I am.

Laura not only competes herself but now trains others to compete in agility too

Share with us your proudest moment so far

My proudest moment so far, apart from raising my beautiful daughter has to be making Team GB with Jade and being picked for the Team to go to Vienna. Still can’t quite believe it.

What are your top 3 tips connected with what you do for our followers and their active dogs?

1) have fun with your dogs

2) be consistent and

3) have some more fun

What are your plans for the future?

My plans for the future are to just continue, keep trying to build my business, keep having fun with my dogs and keep striving to be better for my dogs.

Laura is a force free, positive trainer who strives to be the best for her dogs

How can our followers get in touch with you?

You can get in touch with me via phone – 07961 796905

Or contact me via FB – Clever Little Dog Agility Training

We’d like to wish Laura the best of luck with all her competing and go Team GB!

The full team competing next weekend can be found here:

https://www.thekennelclub.org.uk/activities/agility/international-agility-teams/european-open-agility-championships/

K9 Trail Time Interview with an expert – Dr Jacqueline Boyd BSc (Hons), MSc, PhD, PGCHE, CHES, FHEA, MRSB

At K9 Trail Time we use a holistic approach for the health of our active dogs and so we think EVERYTHING should be taken into consideration when you want to keep your dog in tip top condition. A big part of this is feeding and nutrition, so who better to have on our expert panel than a bona fide canine nutritional expert! We hope you find our interview with Dr Jacqueline Boyd interesting and it gives you ‘food’ for thought!

Tell our followers a little bit about what you do, how you got into it, how long you have been doing it and your experience / or qualifications?

I’m currently (as of June this year!) the Nutritional Consultant for Skinner’s Pet Foods, although was a university lecturer in animal and equine science at Nottingham Trent University for the last 11 years. I graduated with my BSc (Hons) Zoology (Parasitology) in 1998 and moved into an MSc in Animal Nutrition, followed by a PhD in Genetics, specifically looking at aspects of development in hosts and parasites and how insulin signalling genes regulated this. Throughout my studies, I was deeply interested in how to manage animal health, welfare and performance and obviously nutrition is a key part of this. I’ve worked with pigs, dairy cattle, sheep, beef cattle in a practical and advisory nutrition role, as well as with laboratory animals in diet trials. My real interest is however in companion species, especially dogs and I have extensive practical experience in a range of canine disciplines, as well as my scientific background. I have cocker spaniels who keep me firmly grounded in reality and the practical applications of animal and nutrition science!

Jacqueline Boyd has years of nutrition experience with sporting dogs of all varieties

What does a day in the life of you consist of?

My job role is an exciting and varied one, albeit a new one! I undertake nutritional consults and provide advice and support to owners and customers – this is always fascinating and really interesting. Research, development, product review and keeping abreast of scientific developments is important too and I work with the marketing and customer support teams to disseminate knowledge and share information. This also involves attendance at key events we sponsor and have trade stands at. I’m also responsible for developing training material for our staff to ensure best and most current practice. So far, my job is varied, flexible and gives me an opportunity to use both my practical and theoretical knowledge to make the world a little better for dogs and their people

Share with us your proudest moment so far

From a career point of view, when I see the application of any information I have delivered/disseminated/taught or researched, that makes me proud but also massively humble! It’s great to hear positive reports from people based on advice given and also seeing students I have worked with move on to bigger things (many are now also working in nutrition!)

From a canine point of view, I’ve been lucky to have amazing dogs, but two key successes are – my first cocker spaniel, Megan got me to Crufts in 2007 as part of the Irish International Agility Pentathlon Team and one of my current spaniels, Molly won The Field magazine’s “Naughtiest Gundog” award last year!!

What are your top 3 tips connected with what you do for our followers and their active dogs?

  1. You ALWAYS take home the best dog – never forget that your dog is your buddy as well as your competitive partner 😊
  2. Feed according to fact, not fad! – Canine nutrition is a hot topic but just because something works for one person/dog, does not mean that it will work for you. Science is continually helping us make better dietary choices and developments that impact on health and welfare and being aware of this is key. Lots of factors impact on dietary choices for our dogs!
  3. You cannot manage what you do not monitor – whether this is weight, body condition score, exercise tolerance, food intake etc. As a scientist, monitoring biological characteristics is key to managing them, especially for our canine athletes.

What are your plans for the future?

I feel hugely privileged to be able to share and indulge my knowledge and passions in my job. My overall aim is to continue to try and make the world a better place for dogs and their owners by improving health, welfare and the human-dog bond. I also want to continue working my cocker spaniels in agility and in the field as gundogs and work towards my personal ambition of a homebred, dual Field Trial and Agility champion! I might never make it, but I intend to have a lot of fun trying!

Jacqueline has had great success competing with her own dogs

How can our followers get in touch with you?

I can be contacted at Skinner’s on jackieboyd@skinners.co.uk or in person at many agility events and or Game fairs where Skinner’s has a stand.

K9 Trail Time Interview with an expert (or two) Dr Anne Carter & Emily Hall MRCVS Experts on Heatstroke in Dogs

There is so much information out there about how we should or shouldn’t look after our dogs in the hotter weather. Is it safe to run our dogs? Should we run our dogs? How should we exercise them? There are so many different questions and if you ask on any canicross page you will get a range of answers. As we at K9 Trail Time are trying to get the best information out there we went straight to Dr Anne Carter and Emily Hall MRCVS from Nottingham Trent University who have, over the past few years been looking at how dogs respond to heat, especially when running in harness. There is very little published research about dogs exercising in hotter or more humid conditions and so the work that Anne and Emily have been doing is invaluable to our dogs.

Dr Anne Carter herself knows about the risks associated with dogs in the heat as she regularly competes in canicross races with her own dogs

The first question everyone wants to know is how do we know if it is too hot? Does the temperature x humidity = 1000 actually mean anything?

As part of our research we calculated the “temperature x humidity” for 210 dogs at 10 canicross races, to see if the “do not run your dog if temperature (oC) x humidity (%) is greater than 1000” guideline was an accurate predictor of “safe” dog temperature. We found no correlation between the temperature x humidity value and dog temperature, or the number of dogs developing hyperthermia, or the number of dogs developing a temperature at risk of heatstroke, so would not recommend using this as a hard and fast rule.

If there is no set way to determine if it is too hot, how do we plan training our dogs over the summer so that they are fit enough for the racing season in September?

Unfortunately, there is no ‘one size fits all’ approach. Black and male dogs are at higher risk, as well as those that are overweight, unfit, dehydrated or have a breathing disorder (including brachycephalic dogs). The important thing is to know your dog, some dogs cope better with the heat than others. Heatstroke is still possible in winter. Dogs can acclimatize but this can take around 6 weeks, something the British weather doesn’t often lend itself to. So if the temperature suddenly increases, the risk may be higher than after a steady increase. Try to exercise in the cooler parts of the day and use alternative keep fit options like swimming. Above all, get to know your dog! Crucially, does your dog stop or slow down when they get too hot (if so you’re lucky), or, will they run until they collapse. If your dog is the latter, you need to be extra careful.

Research has shown that black dogs suffer more in the heat that other coloured coated dogs

What is humidity and why does everyone make a big deal about it? How does it affect the dogs?

As with people, high humidity can make a temperature feel a lot warmer and a run feel a lot harder. It is used to calculate the ‘feels like’ temperature. In high humidity, it is harder for dogs to dissipate heat, making them more at risk of heatstroke. Both humans and dogs rely on some heat being lost through evaporation, in humans we have sweat to evaporate, dogs use panting. At any temperature, a high humidity will limit evaporation, limiting heat loss.

When running our dogs in harness over the warmer months are there things we can look out for to make sure that our dogs aren’t over heating?

Early signs your dog is getting hot include increased salivating, excessive panting that doesn’t stop after rest, and a large and darker tongue. This can progress on to staggering and loss of balance, eventually causing collapse. One early sign could be that your dog stops pulling, or starts to stumble and trip more frequently. Reducing speed can help and letting them take a dip to cool down throughout the run.

Allowing your dog plenty of breaks to cool off if running in higher temperatures or if you suspect they may be getting warm

 

What if my dog doesn’t really pull in harness, they just trot, and does that make a difference?

The less effort the dog puts in to a run, the lower the temperature of the dog-on average. There is still a risk of heatstroke, particularly in very hot weather, but we did find slower speeds didn’t increase body temperature as much as fast speeds.

 

Can I run my dog in their cooling coat? It helps them keep cool at home…

The problem with cooling coats is they can affect the dog’s natural cooling mechanism. The only study to look at cooling coats put them on greyhounds after a sprint race. Those in cooling coats had a higher body temperature than those without. There is no current evidence investigating the use of cooling coats during exercise, so we can’t comment on this, but if it’s hot enough that you think you might need a cooling coat, then perhaps a walk in the shade or a dip in the river might be a better option.

If that isn’t a good idea then how do I cool my dog down after a run? What if my dog doesn’t like getting in water?

After a run, active cooling is a good idea. Standing in or lying down in water, splashing luke warm water under their belly. Avoid using cold or iced water or submerging them in it as this can restrict blood vessels in the body and increase the risk of shock. If they don’t like water, they can be walked round or rested in the shade to cool them off, air movement is also very effective so pick a windy spot, or use the car air conditioning or a fan if you’re worried.

Sometimes our dogs put on weight over the summer as they do less, does this affect how they cope in warmer temperatures?

Increased weight can increase a dog’s ability to cope with the heat. It your dog is a little less svelte than usual, you will need to be more cautious when exercising in warmer weather. Reducing food intake relative to exercise can help keep the pounds off through the summer

Many factors affect a dogs’ ability to cool itself but keeping them fit and a healthy weight will help

Our dogs do agility and other sports over the summer and always seem fine; should we be watching for anything whilst competing in other sports or is it just harness sports?

Heatstroke is a risk for all dogs at any time but particularly when exercising in warm weather. Although sports such as agility are for much shorter periods of time, ambient temperatures are often higher so the risk of heatstroke is just as real.

If you are worried that your dog is suffering from heatstroke, active cooling is key. The car air con can be very useful, but the best chance of survival is to get them to the vets as quickly as possible.

 

So it sounds like there are still quite a few unanswered questions regarding heatstroke in exercising dogs, do you have any plans for more research?

We have just finished surveying owners of sports dogs about methods of cooling used, so expect to hear the results of that study in the hopefully not too distant future! We are also currently researching cooling after canicross races, measuring the dog’s temperature for up to 20 minutes after a race to see what impacts how quickly they cool, this study is still on going so you’ll have to wait a little longer for the results of that one.

Emily Hall MRCVS who has devoted a huge amount of time to this research to help dog owners recognise the signs of heatstroke and prevent unnecessary cases of it

Our next big research project is looking at activity levels in all types of dogs, any age, any breed and any health status, looking at how much exercise dogs are getting in general, but also how extreme weather impacts their ability to exercise, so if you can spare 5 minutes, please complete our survey!

The link is here (https://ntusurvey.onlinesurveys.ac.uk/investigating-dog-activity-levels), and is open until the end of the year (Dec 2018), if you have more than one dog, and can spare the time please fill it in as many times as you need to.

The results of all our studies can be found on our blog: https://hotdogscanineheatstroke.wordpress.com/

K9 Trail Time Interview with an expert – Catherine Nicoll, Clinical Canine Massage Therapist

Our next professional to feature in the ‘Interview with an expert series’ is Catherine Nicoll, a Clinical Canine Massage Therapist, who we have been going to see to keep the dogs in tip top condition since she set up in 2012.

Canine massage has been something the K9 Trail Time dogs have had incorporated into our training programme for 6 years now

Tell our followers a little bit about what you do, how you got into it, how long you have been doing it and your experience / or qualifications?

I am a Clinical Canine Massage Therapist so I specialise in treating soft tissue, muscular issues such as lameness/limping and dogs with Orthopaedic conditions like hip dysplasia and Arthritis. I also treat dogs post operation like Cruciate Ligament or Luxating Patella. I do 4 disciplines of massage to include Swedish, Sports Massage which is used for injury identification, isolating muscles by working from origin to insertion and I focus on trigger point release and scar tissue remodelling. I also do deep tissue massage which mobilises the deeper muscles, spreading fibres to make the muscles more supple and flexible. Finally, I do Myofascial Release. Muscles need to be able to slide and glide and myofascial release releases muscles from each other and from the periosteum of the bone. I treat elderly dogs who are slowing down and getting stiff as well as sporting dogs who have either injured themselves with sprains or strains or for maintenance to keep their muscles in good working order. I completed the Diploma in Canine Massage Therapy in January 2012 and set up my business, Dogs Body Canine Massage Therapy, immediately after.

Catherine treats many dogs besides sports dogs, as all dogs can benefit from massage

The reason I got into massage is that I am a qualified human sports massage therapist and, having regular massage myself, knew how beneficial it was. My dog, Paddy, kept going lame when he was 15 months old and after x-rays and further investigation I was told by the vet that they couldn’t find any issues and so I would need to just keep him on lead walks. I looked into having him massaged and when I took him to Natalie Lenton from The Canine Massage Therapy Centre, she found the problem with his lameness immediately. He had a strain (tear to his muscle) in his superficial pectoral muscle which was making him lame. I was so impressed and relieved to know what the problem was that I decided to sign up for the course. The course took me 18 months to complete and I left my job of 20 years working in a bank to set up my own business.

What does a day in the life of you consist of?

My day varies. I am lucky that my Clinic is at my home so in between treatments I can be with my own dogs. I have treated up to 8 dogs in one day but ideally prefer to treat 4-5 dogs a day. As well as doing Clinical Canine Massage Therapy, I am also a Tutor on The Clinical Canine Massage Practitioner Programme run by The Canine Massage Therapy Centre and so my days are sometimes taken up with tutor work in preparation for the students. Being self-employed means that I can choose to take an impromptu day off when I like which I love! I also run 1-day workshops for members of the public to enable them to learn some Swedish massage techniques to do on their own dog at home. (Details on my website).

Dogs tend to relax into the massage and benefits begin to be seen after a session or two

Share with us your proudest moment so far

Every day that I am helping dogs makes me proud. I guess if I had to choose one, however, it would be changing one elderly dog’s life completely. His owner was thinking about having him put to sleep as he could hardly walk and was miserable but decided to try massage as a last resort. After 2 sessions he was happier, more mobile and enjoying his walks. He went on to live for another 3 years.

What are your top 3 tips connected with what you do for our followers and their active dogs?

  1. If you have laminated/wood flooring put non-slip runners down! Dogs are digit grade animals which means they walk on their toes. They cannot grip hard floors and so end up slipping around which puts a lot of strain on their muscles and inevitably end up getting injured.
  2. Get your dog check out by a Canine Massage Guild member. We are trained to identify muscular issues so by bringing them for a massage 2-3 times a year it enables us Therapists to spot any issues before they become a problem. We work “best practice” and so, if your dog is injured you should see an improvement in 1-3 sessions. In the unlikely event that you don’t, we would cease further treatment and refer your dog back to the vet for further investigation.
  3. Dogs get injured the same as humans do, think about what you are doing with your dog. Don’t keep using ball launchers to exercise your dog. Warm them up on lead for 10 minutes before letting them off to run. Feed them a good diet and don’t let them get fat! Give them a day off from exercise. Mental stimulation is just as important as physical. Don’t feel guilty if you are unable to take your dog for a walk one day, it’s not going to do them any harm and the rest will give their body time to recover.

Catherine will be continuing to help owners and their dogs but also by training other therapists, bring the benefit of massage to many more dog owners

What are your plans for the future?

I am passionate about what I do and so I just want to keep on helping dogs with mobility issues and make a difference to their lives. I will keep on learning more about canine anatomy and physiology as I find it fascinating. I want to continue to educate dog owners on the benefits of Clinical Canine Massage Therapy as there are still people out there who have never heard of it, although that has improved in the years since I trained!

 

How can our followers get in touch with you?

You can visit my website www.dogsbodycaninemassage.co.uk you can email me at mail@dogsbodycaninemassage.co.uk or ring me on 07967 099603. I am based in Hartpury, Gloucestershire. I have a Facebook page too so please go in and “like” my page – https://www.facebook.com/DogsBodyCMT/  

If I am not local to you, then visit The Canine Massage Guild website and find your local therapist there. http://www.k9-massageguild.co.uk

K9 Trail Time Interview with an expert – Claire Martin, Dog Behaviourist

Here at K9 Trail Time we believe in so much more than just going out for a run or being active with your dog. We like to look at the whole picture when it comes to our dogs and what we do. We retail active dog products but think our customers would like a broader picture of active dog health and well-being, so we’ve come up with our ‘Interview with an expert’ series where we will be asking different experts, that we feel are relevant to having an active and happy dog, questions which will give you an insight into how they help active dogs to keep fit both mentally and physically.

Our first expert is Claire Martin who is (amongst other things) a qualified dog behaviourist.

Claire is our expert because she knows how the ‘active dog’ mind works

Tell our followers a little bit about what you do, how you got into it, how long you have been doing it and your experience / or qualifications?

I have been training dogs ever since I adopted my first “own” dog – a rescue greyhound called Poppy. As a teacher, at that time, I was well versed in educational methods and good dog training is positive and kind as good education should be.

I got into studying behaviour and training dogs when I took on a foster dog that had significant behavioural problems, I needed to understand why she was afraid and how that had happened to her and so I took the brave move and made a career change that I had always wanted to and studied with COAPE to become a CAPBT Behaviourist and Trainer. I also became a full member of the IMDT and a FFTT (force free trick trainer). I now realise how the past experiences that the foster dog had been through had affected her and that it had literally changed the way her brain worked. Sadly there is a lot of poor information about how dogs should be trained, much promulgated by unscientific celebrity dog trainers that have access to peoples homes through the media.

Claire believes in force free training, as do we at K9 Trail Time

Over the last 5 years that I have been working as a behaviourist and trainer, things have already started to change and positive, reward based methods are pushing the out of date and inaccurate pack theory and dominance methods of the past. I started canicrossing 10 years ago and scooter racing 4 years ago. I, with a group of friends, set up Canicross Midlands and our team now run a 14 race series as well as other stand alone races and events and we have 5 regional groups that bring in and support new people entering into the sport. I also run my own Chrysalis Canicross Series which is a very unique “league” format.

 

What does a day in the life of you consist of?

Each day varies significantly, one thing is constant though – I always spend time training and enjoying the company of my dogs. They travel with me almost everywhere I go. Some days I might have 6 agility classes, other days trick training classes, life skills classes and then there are the 1-2-1 behavioural consultations to help people with dogs who struggle to cope with some aspect of life. Often I work late into the evenings, often teaching classes at 9pm! The advantage is that I have mornings free and that’s when I do admin and train my dogs. Weekends are either taken up with my own competing – winter for canicross and scooter, summer for agility but I also run weekend workshops at my training venue too. Its certainly not a 9-5 job! My van is my mobile office, mobile home and a mobile kennel! My dogs sleep in bed with me and often share my meals – truly my family in every way. Some of my dogs are the right temperament to stooge for fearful dogs and that skill is very special indeed. Currently I have 8 dogs who share my life.

Claire works on building a bond with dog and owner, through understanding of behaviour

Share with us your proudest moment so far

I have a client with a very scared dog. He’s a powerful breed and he is afraid of people. He is a rescue dog and he could be very dangerous if he wasn’t so well cared for and supported. The day I became one of his safe people was a very powerful one – it took time, love and trust for him to learn I wasn’t a threat and now he will greet me with his paws on my shoulders and a happy wag. He’s well on the way through his journey to lifetime happiness – he is a lucky lad – few owners would be so dedicated to him and his owner cries with me often, happy tears – as he makes progress. Saving dogs that have had tough starts is incredibly rewarding because often by the time I get to meet them they are already a family member and dearly loved – even if they are hard to like at times.

What are your top 3 tips connected with what you do for our followers and their active dogs?

1 – Remember that your sport dog has absolutely no idea if they have won or lost, come first or last, its our job to make them believe that they have won – they don’t value ribbons, bits of tin and glass, they know how you feel about them – they understand love and pride in their achievement – so make sure your dog always feels like they are a winner.

Although it can be fun to win things, your dog has no idea what ‘winning’ means, they should win every time

2 – Never punish a dog for your failings, indeed – never punish a dog. They didn’t do that thing that infuriated you because they were mad at you, they don’t know that you had a bad day at work, they just know how you feel and they think that if you are angry that you are angry at them. We have them each in our lives for maybe a decade, sometimes more – make every day with us happy and special. Let their happiness to greet us at the end of a tiring day put to rest any other frustrations and who cares if a cushion exploded!

3 – Play with your dog – play tug, teach them tricks, teach them games other than the sport you want to compete in. If you want to canicross seriously then take them to scent work classes for fun. Teach them formal obedience and who cares if your breed doesn’t “do” obedience – if you want to and its fun for you both then who cares? If you have multiple dogs spend at least 1 hour a week with each dog on their own doing something special that the two of you enjoy.

Claire with one of her own dogs (she has 8!)

What are your plans for the future?

Chrysalis K9 is growing fast. I’m not alone now with Vay Coltrose working alongside me. We want an indoor training venue for classes over the winter and we want to spread the word of positive training in harness sports far and wide – which we are already doing through our Canicross Midlands Summer Camp. For me personally, I am hoping to get my own dog Axis confident in competition on the scooter as he is certainly physically capable and I hope that Sirius and I will achieve our goals in agility. I’ll keep on rescuing dogs though currently single figures of dogs is my limit!

 

Claire can be contacted through her business Chrysalis K9

How can our followers get in touch with you?

PM messages via facebook on my work page are probably the easiest way to contact me https://www.facebook.com/ChrysalisK9/ . I try to keep work stuff on my work page and my personal page for personal stuff – but of course there is overlap. I have email as well – Claire@chrysalis-k9.co.uk

Thanks so much to Claire for answering our questions, we hope you’ve found her answers of interest – Happy trails!

Tri Dog – The first UK Triathlon with Dogs

In 2017 the Tri Dog events committee (made up of recreational, national and international athletes) organised the very first triathlon with dogs in the UK. As individuals we all wanted to be involved in running events and do something for the dog sports community, but there are so many organisations doing such a good job of the standard canicross and bikejor events, we wanted to do something a bit different.
The aim of Tri Dog was to arrange a 3 stage event where participants swim with their dogs, then exit the water and transition onto the bike to complete an off road bike course, then transition to the trail running section to finish the triathlon. To explain a little bit more about how this works with dogs we’ve divided the triathlon into the three disciplines.
Swimming:
Swimming with dogs hasn’t got a specific name and isn’t yet a recognised sport, there are however a number of groups beginning to hold Canine SUP and swimming sessions across the UK. For our Tri Dog events we request that your dog is attached to you via a lead of some description for safety. The idea is to try and get your dog to either swim alongside you in the open water or if you’ve got a really strong swimmer, they can even pull you if they are wearing a comfortable harness.

Swimming with your dog – Photo courtesy of John Boulton

Bikejor:
Biking with dogs is known as bikejoring and although originates from the sled dog sports where people used bikes to keep their dogs fit in the spring and autumn when there was no snow for sledding, is now a sport in it’s own right. Riders usually have a mountain bike with an attachment which helps to keep the bungee line from falling in the wheel if the dog stops suddenly and the dog is in harness, attached to the bike via a bungee lead around the headstock of the bike. Bikejor is much faster than canicross and the top dog and rider combinations are reaching speeds of in excess of 30 mph on some of the trails.

You can bike or scooter with your dogs for the wheeled stage but most chose to bike – Photo courtesy of John Boulton

Canicross:
Running with dogs is now more commonly known as canicross and is defined as cross country running with your dog attached to you. To take part in canicross races, your dog must have a correctly fitting harness and be attached via a bungee lead to a waistbelt worn by the person. Canicross is the fastest growing sport of the 3 in the UK and there have been specific races for people to take part in with their dogs for over 10 years now.

Canicross is a rapidly growing sport in the UK – Photo courtesy of Take 2 Event Photos

The Tri Dog series of training and events got underway at the beginning of October 2016 with our first training weekend, we then went on to hold a duathlon in January 2017 to practice the transitions and ensure we could run the event safely with numerous dogs in one area. The training and duathlon went without a hitch, so it was full steam at the end of April for our first dog triathlon!
We chose to host the event at Box End Park near Milton Keynes because we’ve attended events there before and the site was perfect for everything we needed, with two separate transition areas, one at each end of the park. We wanted plenty of space for everyone so no one felt pressured to transition quicker than they wanted to, the aim was to keep everything very calm for the dogs and we think we achieved this.

We kept our transition area calm for the dogs at both the duathlon and triathlon – Photo courtesy of Take 2 Event Photos

The other big consideration we had was what time of year we held the event as the water temperature needed to be warm enough for the human and dog combinations to complete the 70 metre swim comfortably but also cool enough for the dogs for the bikejor and canicross sections. We had many a discussion about this and decided the end of April and end of September were probably our best bets and that certainly seemed to be the case for our first triathlon.
We had in excess of 60 entries over the weekend, made up of individuals completing the triathlon or a duathlon which we also ran after the main triathlon. We also allowed people to put together teams so they could relay the 3 stages if they wanted to, so everybody who wanted to come and have a go at the event could enter something they felt comfortable with completing.
The best part of the weekend for us as organisers was to see the real look of achievement as people crossed the finish lines with their dogs and received their competitors medal. The triathlon was a real test of people’s bond with their dog as it takes quite a lot of trust and training to be able to swim, bike and run with your dog. Not to mention the fact that although the distances were kept short (70 metres for the swim, 2.5 km for the bike and 2.5 km for the run) you needed to have a decent level of fitness to be able to race in all 3 disciplines, one after the other. At every stage we saw participants working with their dogs and it was evident who had done the most training from the dogs’ trust in their owner to guide them through the event from start to finish, competing in a race they would never have experienced before.

Competitors had a real sense of achievement after completing the event – Photo courtesy of John Boulton

We are pleased to say the September event also had a great response and we managed to increase our numbers slightly and had some great feedback from both events. We are looking forward to hosting the next Tri Dog triathlon at the beginning of May at Box End Park again. We have learnt valuable lessons about timings, numbers and general administration of the event, so we are confident we can improve on the 2017 events and give people an even better experience of triathlon with dogs at the next one.
To find out more about the events please visit our Facebook page www.facebook.com/TriDogUK/, where will be beginning to post updates and information about the next event soon or visit our website: http://www.tri-dog.com/
We look forward to seeing more people entering and completing their first triathlon with their dog with us in 2018!