Hitting the trails – Hiking with your dog (Harnesses)

During the summer months when it’s warmer we tend to do more walking with the dogs and take the opportunity to enjoy a slower pace when we are out and about. We still always use a harness on the dogs, even for our walks, because of the pressure on the neck that using a collar and lead exerts if your dog pulls at all. We also use a hands free system with a walking belt and bungee lead, even if some of the dogs are off lead most of the time, they have a line attached to a belt just in case they need to be under control if we come across livestock or need to cross a road.

We always use harnesses for dog walking but these are different to the ones we use for canicrossing

All of the harnesses we use for walking are also suitable for canicross but because they are shorter in style, allow you the flexibility to let your dog off lead safely in them, as there is less to get caught in undergrowth.

Our favourite hiking harness is the Non-stop Half Harness because it’s padded throughout with strong buckles and webbing straps either side which offer plenty of adjustment to ensure a snug fit on your dogs’ body. The Non-stop Harness was originally designed for tracking and features a concealed ring on the underside of the harness too. A snug fit on body and neck means the harness doesn’t move on your dogs’ back if they are off to one side or the other sniffing. This also makes it a good canicross harness for dogs who drop back and drop to the side but it’s perfect for our strong pullers when walking:

https://www.k9trailtime.com/shop/non-stop-half-harness.html

The Non-stop Half Harness is one of our favourite harnesses for walking / hiking

We also love the Howling Dog Alaska Distance Harness because it too offers a great option for both canicross and walking. It has one strong plastic clip and adjustable webbing on the chest and is padded through the neck and chest section to offer comfort for your dog. The Distance harness offers two points for you to attach a line to, the ring on the back of the harness and a cord from the ring which sits further down the dogs’ back, this gives you the choice of how much freedom you give your dog on the walk. The ring offers closer control, the cord more freedom:

https://www.k9trailtime.com/shop/howling-dog-distance-harness.html

The Howling Dog Alaska Distance Harness has two points of line attachment

Another great multi purpose harness is the Neewa Adjustable Running Harness because it is padded through the neck and chest and as well as being adjustable on the chest, it is the only harness we stock which is also adjustable on the neck. The Neewa Running Harness is again great for walking your dog in because of the adjustment, ensuring a snug fit and that the harness doesn’t move around over your dogs’ back if you’re just wandering along and stopping for little breaks:

https://www.k9trailtime.com/shop/neewa-running-harness.html

The Neewa Running harness being adjustable on the neck and chest was the perfect harness to get Yogi used to walking in one.

The Zero DC Short harness is another one than can be used for walking and of all the harnesses we sell is the most popular for canicross, dog walking and a range of other activities such as swimming and agility. The Zero DC Short, in spite of it’s name, sits the longest down the back of the harnesses we’ve suggested for walking. This means it does move a little more over the dogs’ back but this doesn’t cause any issues. We use these harnesses a lot for swimming as they are so lightweight and dry quickly:

https://www.k9trailtime.com/shop/euro-short-zero-dc-sports-harness.html

The Zero DC Short harness

All of the harnesses we use for walking / hiking are lightweight, dry quickly if they get wet and can be used for canicross as well as off lead work such as agility and flyball.

So if you’re thinking of doing more walking with your dog, your dog pulls and / or you would like to be hands free for a more comfortable experience, you can look into getting your dog a hiking harness and belt set up with us to enjoy hitting the trails with your four legged friend.

Make your walks more enjoyable by getting yourself a proper walking / hiking set up

For a personalised harness consultation please e-mail info@k9trailtime.com

Happy Trails!

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Hitting the trails – Hiking with your dog (Belts)

We haven’t been doing much canicrossing recently due to the warmer weather, so we’ve been doing a lot more early morning walking instead. Most of the K9 Trail Time team can be let off lead but there are times when they all have to be under control, for example if there are fields with livestock or if we come across a road. It’s at these times when we use slightly different equipment to the canicross kit we usually use, as it’s good to have another style of belt and harness if you want your dog to recognise when you will be walking and when you are canicrossing.

Our walking belts can also be used as canicross belts but for canicross we prefer something with less padding and for walking we prefer the more padded styles, so for regular walking we like the Zero DC canicross belt found here:

https://www.k9trailtime.com/shop/zero-dc-canicross-waist-belt.html

It has a big pocket and the cord on the front means we can easily have 4 separate lines attached, plus the extra padding is useful if they do all decide to pull and leg straps prevent it riding up the body. It comes in a range of colours too.

The Zero DC canicross belt with it’s big pocket, leg straps and cord at the front to attach dogs to, is perfect for walking too

We also like the Dragrattan Simple Canicross Belt which also has a cord at the front, leg straps to keep it in place but no pocket. It’s thick padded waist band should be worn low on the hips and offers great comfort when walking strong dogs:

https://www.k9trailtime.com/shop/dragrattan-canicross-belt.html

The Non-stop Trekking Belt is also a very padded, comfortable belt with leg straps but with a fixed point at the front in case you prefer a little bit of extra control when walking, perhaps not so suitable for multiple dogs but perfect for one or two dogs. It comes in a range of colours.

https://www.k9trailtime.com/shop/non-stop-trekking-waist-belt.html

The Trekking Belt now comes in Navy Blue and Purple as well as plain Black

If leg straps are not your thing then the Neewa Trekking Belt is a great value walking option and has a central webbing strap to keep it in place on your hips plus two straps which meet in the middle to attach your dog/s to. It has slight stretch through these straps as they have an elasticated section and has a decent sized pocket attached to it:

https://www.k9trailtime.com/shop/neewa-trekking-waist-belt.html

We also have the Howling Dog Alaska Trekking Belt which is great if you prefer a very supportive option for a walking belt. The belt has a good sized pocket and a thick webbing strap which adjusts, sliding through the middle and you attach your dog/s to a solid ring stitched into the webbing, which provides a very secure option for attaching dogs to a fixed point in front of you:

https://www.k9trailtime.com/shop/howling-dog-trekking-waist-belt.html

All of the belts we stock provide you with a much better experience for walking dogs than simply holding a lead, as you will have your hands free and will be far more comfortable, especially if your dog pulls. Hands free hiking with your dog is a great way to exercise together without the worry of your dog being loose if there are roads or livestock nearby and you can use it as an opportunity to train your voice commands at a slower speed. Hiking with your dog is also perfect for younger or older dogs who might not be fit for canicross and can give you a similar experience to canicross at a much more sedate pace. You might also enjoy hiking with your dog if you are injured yourself and need to build up strength slowly.

Managing multiple dogs can be tricky without a belt, especially if they pull – Photo courtesy of Simon Warwick

If you have any questions about hiking with your dog please do contact us by e-mailing info@k9trailtime.com – Happy Trails!

K9 Trail Time Interview with an expert – Catherine Nicoll, Clinical Canine Massage Therapist

Our next professional to feature in the ‘Interview with an expert series’ is Catherine Nicoll, a Clinical Canine Massage Therapist, who we have been going to see to keep the dogs in tip top condition since she set up in 2012.

Canine massage has been something the K9 Trail Time dogs have had incorporated into our training programme for 6 years now

Tell our followers a little bit about what you do, how you got into it, how long you have been doing it and your experience / or qualifications?

I am a Clinical Canine Massage Therapist so I specialise in treating soft tissue, muscular issues such as lameness/limping and dogs with Orthopaedic conditions like hip dysplasia and Arthritis. I also treat dogs post operation like Cruciate Ligament or Luxating Patella. I do 4 disciplines of massage to include Swedish, Sports Massage which is used for injury identification, isolating muscles by working from origin to insertion and I focus on trigger point release and scar tissue remodelling. I also do deep tissue massage which mobilises the deeper muscles, spreading fibres to make the muscles more supple and flexible. Finally, I do Myofascial Release. Muscles need to be able to slide and glide and myofascial release releases muscles from each other and from the periosteum of the bone. I treat elderly dogs who are slowing down and getting stiff as well as sporting dogs who have either injured themselves with sprains or strains or for maintenance to keep their muscles in good working order. I completed the Diploma in Canine Massage Therapy in January 2012 and set up my business, Dogs Body Canine Massage Therapy, immediately after.

Catherine treats many dogs besides sports dogs, as all dogs can benefit from massage

The reason I got into massage is that I am a qualified human sports massage therapist and, having regular massage myself, knew how beneficial it was. My dog, Paddy, kept going lame when he was 15 months old and after x-rays and further investigation I was told by the vet that they couldn’t find any issues and so I would need to just keep him on lead walks. I looked into having him massaged and when I took him to Natalie Lenton from The Canine Massage Therapy Centre, she found the problem with his lameness immediately. He had a strain (tear to his muscle) in his superficial pectoral muscle which was making him lame. I was so impressed and relieved to know what the problem was that I decided to sign up for the course. The course took me 18 months to complete and I left my job of 20 years working in a bank to set up my own business.

What does a day in the life of you consist of?

My day varies. I am lucky that my Clinic is at my home so in between treatments I can be with my own dogs. I have treated up to 8 dogs in one day but ideally prefer to treat 4-5 dogs a day. As well as doing Clinical Canine Massage Therapy, I am also a Tutor on The Clinical Canine Massage Practitioner Programme run by The Canine Massage Therapy Centre and so my days are sometimes taken up with tutor work in preparation for the students. Being self-employed means that I can choose to take an impromptu day off when I like which I love! I also run 1-day workshops for members of the public to enable them to learn some Swedish massage techniques to do on their own dog at home. (Details on my website).

Dogs tend to relax into the massage and benefits begin to be seen after a session or two

Share with us your proudest moment so far

Every day that I am helping dogs makes me proud. I guess if I had to choose one, however, it would be changing one elderly dog’s life completely. His owner was thinking about having him put to sleep as he could hardly walk and was miserable but decided to try massage as a last resort. After 2 sessions he was happier, more mobile and enjoying his walks. He went on to live for another 3 years.

What are your top 3 tips connected with what you do for our followers and their active dogs?

  1. If you have laminated/wood flooring put non-slip runners down! Dogs are digit grade animals which means they walk on their toes. They cannot grip hard floors and so end up slipping around which puts a lot of strain on their muscles and inevitably end up getting injured.
  2. Get your dog check out by a Canine Massage Guild member. We are trained to identify muscular issues so by bringing them for a massage 2-3 times a year it enables us Therapists to spot any issues before they become a problem. We work “best practice” and so, if your dog is injured you should see an improvement in 1-3 sessions. In the unlikely event that you don’t, we would cease further treatment and refer your dog back to the vet for further investigation.
  3. Dogs get injured the same as humans do, think about what you are doing with your dog. Don’t keep using ball launchers to exercise your dog. Warm them up on lead for 10 minutes before letting them off to run. Feed them a good diet and don’t let them get fat! Give them a day off from exercise. Mental stimulation is just as important as physical. Don’t feel guilty if you are unable to take your dog for a walk one day, it’s not going to do them any harm and the rest will give their body time to recover.

Catherine will be continuing to help owners and their dogs but also by training other therapists, bring the benefit of massage to many more dog owners

What are your plans for the future?

I am passionate about what I do and so I just want to keep on helping dogs with mobility issues and make a difference to their lives. I will keep on learning more about canine anatomy and physiology as I find it fascinating. I want to continue to educate dog owners on the benefits of Clinical Canine Massage Therapy as there are still people out there who have never heard of it, although that has improved in the years since I trained!

 

How can our followers get in touch with you?

You can visit my website www.dogsbodycaninemassage.co.uk you can email me at mail@dogsbodycaninemassage.co.uk or ring me on 07967 099603. I am based in Hartpury, Gloucestershire. I have a Facebook page too so please go in and “like” my page – https://www.facebook.com/DogsBodyCMT/  

If I am not local to you, then visit The Canine Massage Guild website and find your local therapist there. http://www.k9-massageguild.co.uk

The Road to Recovery…

I wanted to write a short blog on injuries and recovery, not that I am an expert in any way, shape, or form but both myself and my dogs have suffered various injuries over the years, as you would expect having been competing for 5 seasons now. This is from a very personal and non-medical perspective and is really just my thoughts on how I have managed the problems I have encountered.

Firstly, the main thing to do is accept you may have to rest, either yourself or your dog, as with any injury one of the first things to do is to rest the problem. Now I am not as good at doing this, as I am enforcing it for my dogs but I have had a few periods of complete rest during the last 5 years.

Rest is a very important part of recovery

Rest is a very important part of recovery

Secondly, get a professional opinion. There is no point guessing what your injury is, or the best way to treat it. If you have a reliable professional you can trust, take yourself to them and listen to their advice. I regularly take my dogs to see a canine massage therapist for a general muscular check up. I am lucky in that I have a great professional network around me for my dogs, so they have never had prolonged periods of rest. I only wish the same could be said for myself!

Professional help with any injury should be sought

Professional help with any injury should be sought

Keep active. If you have to stop canicrossing or bikejoring then don’t forego all activity as a result. Find other things to keep you moving. A perfect example of this is swimming. I personally hate swimming, unless it is in a warm country with a cold drink waiting for me when I get out. I did resort to membership of my local sports centre when I tore the ligaments in my ankles however, and as much as I moaned about the experience, at least I felt like I was doing something to actively recover. More recently, one of my dogs had a cruciate strain and a course of hydrotherapy safely build up his strength, so that when he could begin canicrossing again, he was still fit and strong.

Hydrotherapy and swimming can help to keep active whilst resting an injury

Hydrotherapy and swimming can help to keep active whilst resting an injury

Keep healthy. Having to rest or change your routine is no excuse to start eating rubbish food or ignore your normal diet. Although it may be a comfort to you to indulge in extra treats while you feel sorry for yourself, you will regret it when the time comes to start training again. I have even reduced the amount of food both myself and my dogs are consuming in an effort not to put strain on our bodies (and possibly the injury). It is not easy and I’m not saying that I’ve never let myself put on a few extra pounds when I’ve been injured, just that you need to be mindful of making recovery as easy for yourself as possible. You might also want to consider supplements in your own or your dogs’ diet to help support an active lifestyle, as there are a number of great products on the market now.

Keep positive. I have had periods where I felt like thing weren’t getting any better but in actual fact they were. There is a lot to be said for the power of positive thought and I firmly believe that those who deal with injury in a positive way, recover quicker. My eldest dog was diagnosed with arthritis when she was just 5 years old but we’re nearly 3 years on now and after some initial treatment, we bought her a magnotherapy collar and under the advice of the vet, continued her programme of canicross. Today she is fitter than she has ever been and although I realise there will come a time when she will want to slow down, she is enjoying life far more being included in all our activity then she would if I had just retired her.

Keep positive and you'll be back out there before you know it!

Keep positive and you’ll be back out there before you know it!

To conclude, whatever injury you or your dog have suffered, there are usually options available to you to allow you to continue activity of some description, until you have fully recovered and can get back to your usual routine. It is important to take advice, keep positive and healthy and hopefully you will soon be healed enough to get out enjoying yourself again.