Voice Commands – Who, What, Why, When & How?

Voice commands are a big part of training in the dog sports and it’s important you get them right for you to get the best from your dog, so we thought we would do a quick blog on the Who, What, Why, When & How of voice commands in canicross, bikejor and dog scootering.

Who? – This one is fairly obvious, you are giving the command to your dog and your dog is the one listening and hopefully understanding and responding accordingly. It is worth mentioning that because these commands are for you and your ‘team’, you can use whatever specific words you want, which leads us on to…

What? – The words you choose for your commands can be anything you like, as long as you’ve trained it and your dog understands, no-one else has to. Many people simply use right, left, go on and other short words, some use noises and more obscure terms to indicate directions to their dogs but pick what you can be consistent with and stick to it.

Good voice commands are essential, particularly when you are on a bike or scooter – Photo courtesy of Take 2 Event Photos

Why? – Again relatively obvious but you might be surprised at how many people feel they don’t really need strong voice commands trained, especially when canicrossing, as you can generally reach out and pull your dog away from any situation. However it’s really important that your dog is listening to you and not just hauling you along enjoying doing their own thing with you as a passenger. It helps tire a dog out faster if they are concentrating on what directions you are giving them and it also builds a much stronger bond of trust if you can call to your dog and they want to do what you’re asking of them. As soon as you involve wheels into the equation, with a bike, scooter or rig, then this becomes crucial and we would never recommend trying any of the wheeled dog sports without having a good degree of control over your dogs’ actions through your voice commands first.

When? – Perhaps the most important of the questions on this list. Our answer to this would be to give voice commands ONLY when you need to. All too often you see people repeating over and over again a verbal direction to their dog, the most frequent of these being ‘go, go, go’ or similar. Your dog will switch off if you are continually issuing the same command, your voice will become like ‘white noise’ in the background of what you are doing and you may lose your dogs’ concentration on you as a result. It is much better to keep quiet while your dog is moving forward and save yourself for when you need to turn or stop or do something other than just run forward in a straight line.

You don’t need to be shouting voice commands at your dog during the whole run, if they’re moving forward in the direction you want then you just need to smile and enjoy! – Photo courtesy of Basil Thornton Photography

How? – Again a really important one because the tone and volume you use for your dog can have a huge affect on how motivated your dog is to work for you. If you are shouting at your dog and not using encouragement, then it follows that your dog may not feel so happy about following your directions. If you watch some of the best dog sports people with their dogs, they are generally always minimalist with voice commands, they never raise their voices unless there is danger (dogs have much better hearing than we do!) and they use a tone of voice which is calm, controlled and encouraging for the dogs.

 

Dog sports are always team work, so make sure you’re not too hard on your ‘team’, using encouragement rather than criticism is always more motivational! – Photo courtesy of Houdscape

Always make your training fun for your dog and remember voice commands can be taught from a very young age out on walks, so take the time to get your dog really responsive to your voice and we’re sure you’ll see the benefits when you’re out and about with them. Happy trails!

Bikejor for beginners – A reading list

The coming of the new year has seen many more people looking to take up the sports of running and biking and more importantly for us here at K9 Trail Time, people wanting to run and bike with their dog. Last year I wrote a blog containing the main blogs I have written to help you get started in canicross, so I thought it was about time I did the same for bikejoring.

Bikejoring is rapidly gaining popularity in the UK - Photo courtesy of Mel Parry

Bikejoring is rapidly gaining popularity in the UK – Photo courtesy of Mel Parry

I wrote a bit about getting started in bikejor here:
Getting along to an event is a great way to learn about the equipment and training - Photo courtesy of Fay Frost Photography

Getting started with the help of friends is a great idea – Photo courtesy of Fay Frost Photography

The next two links are an introduction to the equipment and how to train
getting-it-wrong-on-the-bike

Training is important to avoid accident! Photo courtesy of Horses for Courses Photography

The following blog focuses on which bikejor attachment might be the one for you
Rower-land Bike Attachment

Getting the right equipment is important

The below blog contains a few tips for those beginning with their dog in bikejor
With the proper equipment and training you can enter bikejor races all over the country - Photo courtesy of Chillpics

With the proper equipment and training you can enter bikejor races all over the country – Photo courtesy of Chillpics

And lastly if you want to bikejor race with your dog, the racing blog I wrote might be of interest.
We have now competed in two European Championships in both Canicross and Bikejor

We have written about how to get started racing

There is some duplication in these blogs but they give you the very basics you need to know about equipment and training and briefly explain the sport of bikejoring for the beginner. If you have any specific queries then please do contact me emilyt@k9trailtime.com and I’d be happy to help you get started with your dog in one of the sports we love.

Racing Etiquette – Canicross, Bikejor and Dog Scooter Racing

The races for canicross, bikejor and dog scootering are getting so popular now and we are attending so many races on a monthly basis, that I gave up writing race reports a long time ago! From Cornwall to Scotland and everything in between, there are so many club and individual races you can attend with your dog, that the choice is increasing year on year for participants to take part.

Not only have you got dog sport specific races but we are also being welcomed and supported in many trail races designed for off road runners. Clearly this is limited to canicross but it has opened up a number of seriously good trail races to the dog sport world and we are making up a large part of the entry in some events.

Many trail races are now allowing canicross entries which is great news for all dog runners!

Many trail races are now allowing canicross entries which is great news for all dog runners!

What I wanted to write about in this blog is how I think we can improve how these races flow by following some simple rules and racing etiquette to make sure everyone gets the best from their race. The tips below are things I have picked up from a number of years of racing experience and knowing what I have to watch for in my dogs and be vigilant of in others.

So to enjoy my racing I try to follow these simple rules:

1 – If you are overtaking always let the person in front know you are coming – By calling ahead in plenty of time to let the person know you are approaching them, you are giving that person time to move out of your way, which is in your interests and theirs. One of the accepted terms to call is ‘trail right’ or ‘trail left’ depending on which side you intend to overtake on but the most important thing is to give as much warning and be as clear as you can so the person in front can react.

You might catch up with people in races and as you do make sure you call out to let other competitors know you are approaching

You might catch up with people in races and as you do, make sure you call out to let other competitors know you are approaching

2 – Do not sit on the heels of the team in front – This is something that can be very frustrating for both teams, as it can distract the team in front and the way to win races isn’t by allowing your dog to take a ‘tow’ off someone in front all the time. You may also upset non-dog runners in canicross friendly races if you allow your dog to be ‘breathing down the neck’ of the runner in front, so just make sure you leave an acceptable gap until or unless, you are ready to overtake.

Leaving space between competitors is especially important on bikes or scooters - Photo courtesy of Sharon Reid

Leaving space between competitors is especially important on bikes or scooters – Photo courtesy of Sharon Reid

3 – If you are being overtaken, move over – Once the person behind you has caught you, move aside on the trail and allow them to overtake cleanly. Ideally you will have taught your dog an ‘over’ command so that your dog will move on the side of the trail you have directed. Even if you are on a bike or scooter, you should attempt to move your dog over. I have seen many people simply move themselves or their bike or scooter over and the dog is still across the trail; this leaves the line blocking the path of the person behind, preventing them from getting past, which is frustrating for everyone and risks your dog getting in a tangle with theirs.

Moving over on the trail will allow people to overtake you without tangles - Photo courtesy of Fay Frost Photography

Moving over on the trail will allow people to overtake you without tangles – Photo courtesy of Fay Frost Photography

4 – Do not allow your dog to lunge at other dogs (or people) during the race – Even if your dog is only being friendly, you are in a race situation and other competitors will not want your dog interfering with theirs (or them) even if it not being aggressive. The best thing to do if you know your dog is prone to this, is move right out of the way if possible. If it not possible then you must pull your dog in and even pull over to prevent this. If you are being overtaken then it will benefit you to allow the person a clear passage past you and then you can follow on. If you are overtaking and know your dog is prone to lunging you should be working hard during training on a strong ‘on by’, ‘leave’, or ‘straight on’ command, whichever is the most effective for your dog. In this particular situation it is often better to try and get past as quickly as possible and provided the person you’re overtaking is co-operative, it will be better not to slow down and allow your dog time to consider lunging as an option.

Training your dog to be able to pass without problems is a huge part of dog sport racing

Training your dog to be able to pass without problems is a huge part of dog sport racing – Photo courtesy of Tracy Evans

5 – Be mindful of how your voice commands might affect other dogs (or people) on the course – Just be aware as you are coming up behind or being overtaken by another team that suddenly shouting at your dog might spook other dogs (or people) around you. It can be quite intimidating for a nervous dog to be overtaken by someone loudly encouraging their own dog and for this reason it is worth trying to keep commands to a minimum on the course (keeping in mind that it is better to have your dog under your control than not) but again training is the key to this.

In situations where you are surrounded by other competitors, be aware that your voice commands might have an impact on others - Photo courtesy of Sled Dog Photo

In situations where you are surrounded by other competitors, be aware that your voice commands might have an impact on others – Photo courtesy of Sled Dog Photo

If you can master all of the above then you should have a safe and pleasant racing experience. It is always worth doing as much training with other people before and in between races to ensure you and your dog are as relaxed as possible when racing, as adrenalin can run high in both of you. At the end of the day these dog sports events are put on for us to have fun with our dogs and so the main thing is to enjoy your run, whilst being courteous to those around you. Happy Trails!

Bikejor: A Brief Introduction

What is ‘Bikejor’?

Bikejor is the sport of cross country biking with your dog attached to your bike, it can be much faster and more exhilarating than canicross and is particularly suitable for dogs who really embrace running.

What do I need to start bikejoring?

Aside from the obvious (a mountain bike, safety equipment such as hat, glasses and gloves), you will need a comfortable fitting harness for your dog, an attachment for your bike and a long bungee lead to connect you both.

Bikejor is fast and fun for both of you - Photo courtesy of horsesforcourses photography

Bikejor is fast and fun for both of you – Photo courtesy of horsesforcourses photography

Dog Harness

The dog harness will take the pressure of pulling away from your dogs throat, which is essential if your dog is going to be pulling in front of your bike. More information on how to choose a suitable harness for your dog can be found here:

http://www.k9trailtime.com/information/harness-consultation-questions

Bike Attachment

The attachment for the bike helps to prevent the line from dropping into the front wheel if your dog slows down or stops suddenly. It is not a fail-safe but will dramatically reduce the amount of tangles you have. More information on how to choose a bikejor attachment can be found here:

https://k9trailtime.wordpress.com/2014/11/18/bikejor-attachments-which-one-for-you/

Bungee Line

The bungee lead is the shock absorbing element of your equipment and protects both you and your dog from the force of your dog pulling suddenly. When bikejoring, the line length needs to be longer than with canicross to help ensure your dog has enough space and is running clear of the front wheel.

A brief note on bikes

You can start bikejoring with any bike but one which is substantial enough for cross country riding is best. A basic ‘hardtail’ mountain bike is a great starting point. Brakes need to be good and many bikejorers prefer disc brakes as for safety reasons you will need to rely on them!

With the proper equipment and training you can enter bikejor races all over the country - Photo courtesy of Chillpics

With the proper equipment and training you can enter bikejor races all over the country – Photo courtesy of Chillpics

How do I start training for bikejor?

The best way to start your training is by training voice commands on walks, decide early on what your left and right commands will be and try to get a good ‘slow down’ command from the outset.You can use your line or lead to guide your dog in the direction you want them to go and also physically slow them down when you use your ‘steady’ commands.

There are no hard and fast rules about what commands to use and people often use different ones but traditional sled dog commands are based on:

Gee = Right turn

Haw = Left turn

Hike / Mush = Go forward (starts or encourages the dog to move)

On by = To pass another dog or team of dogs

Straight on = To stay straight on the trail if there are many options

Easy = Slow down

Whoa = Stop

Things you can do to encourage your dog to run out front:

Use a higher pitched voice to signal you would like them to up their energy and prepare them for activity. It might sound silly but dogs do respond to pitch changes in voice and if you raise this your dog will learn this means fun!

Go out in a group with more experienced dogs. Dogs learn from each other and will often naturally compete with their peers

Get someone to run or bike in front of you. Again dogs naturally like to chase and by having someone in front of you, they may be more motivated to stay out front. You can even use a favourite toy to encourage your dog to fetch it.

However, try not to rely on this method and always encourage your dog to run independently because it is not always advisable to train your dog to chase! Use the method as a tool and work on building your dogs confidence.

Getting someone to run out in front of you can help teach your dog to pull - Photo courtesy of Fay Frost Photography

Getting someone to run out in front of you can help teach your dog to pull – Photo courtesy of Fay Frost Photography

Our advice at K9 Trail Time is to try and find a group of people who have kit you can borrow. Failing that, have a look at all the options available to you and speak with people who have used the products you are looking to buy.

We try and test all the products on our website http://www.k9trailtime.com so that we can provide you with useful information and comparisons.

You also need to check where you are allowed to train with a bike or scooter locally, as this can be more complex than canicross.

We recommend taking out some kind of sports insurance to cover yourself, when training and racing.

Some Forestry Commission land requires you to have a permit to train and these permits generally require £5 million public liability insurance.

The thing to remember is keep it short (at first), fun and safe, when you get more confidence you can then work on getting faster and even enter some races!

Happy trails! 🙂

Bikejoring Tips For The Beginner

Bikejor seems to be growing in popularity even more rapidly than canicross at the moment, and with so many people keen to get out and try something new with their dog, I thought I would write a few notes to help out the beginners.

Firstly – get yourself along to an event, or group, or chat with someone who has been participating in the sports for a number of years. As a retailer of bikejor equipment I have a duty to my customers to know a bit about the sport through my own personal experience, so I can advise you on kit from the perspective of having used it. I think it’s really important to be able to explain the different equipment having used it myself, so make sure you pick the brains of a number of people, to get a variety of opinions, to give yourself the best start in the sport.

Getting along to an event is a great way to learn about the equipment and training - Photo courtesy of Fay Frost Photography

Getting along to an event is a great way to learn about the equipment and training – Photo courtesy of Fay Frost Photography

Once you have an idea of the basics (the equipment you need, the training you need to do and an idea of where you will be training) you can get started with the voice commands (if you haven’t already) to teach your dog on the ground before you even think about attaching your dog to the bike. The main commands to teach are directions and a stop or steady, to ensure you can safely manouvere on your trails. I wrote a few words about beginning training here:

https://k9trailtime.wordpress.com/2013/11/13/beginning-bikejor-2-training/

Choose a harness which is comfortable for your dog and doesn’t restrict movement in any way. Many dog sports harnesses can be used for all activities, so you may not necessarily need a new harness if you are already participating in some form of dog sport. If you do need any help or advice on selecting a harness for your dog, I have written a bit about this here:

http://www.k9trailtime.com/information/team-thomas-harnesses

The most important bit to get right is choosing a harness that will allow your dog maximum freedom of movement - Photo courtesy of Karen Burd

The most important bit to get right is choosing a harness that will allow your dog maximum freedom of movement – Photo courtesy of Karen Burd

When it comes to selecting a line for bikejor you will want one that has a strong bungee incorporated in it (for shock absorption) and is long enough to allow your dog to run clear of your front wheel. If you already canicross then you may find your line is a bit short for bikejor but you can always try it first to see what works for you. It is worth noting however that for some competions the minimum length of the line needs to be 2.5 metres. It is really important for the safety of both you and your dog that your line is attached to the main frame of your bike and NOT the handle bars or the end of a bikejor attachment. If the line is attached to the handle bars or even yourself, any sharp movement your dog may make will throw you off balance, and if attached to the end of a bikejor attachment, can cause the attachment to break off. In a worse case scenario, it can hit your dog as it tows the loose attachment behind it. To avoid this just follow the manufacturers advice and attach the line to the bike not the attachment itself.

Allways attach your line around the main frame of the bike and loop your line through the attachment. Fixing your line to the end of the attachment is asking for trouble!

Allways attach your line around the main frame of the bike and loop your line through the attachment. Fixing your line to the end of the attachment is asking for trouble!

Talking of the bikejor attachment, it is always worth having a look at the different options available before you purchase one for yourself, as they are all designed to do the same thing (help keep your line from dropping down onto the wheel) but each does this in a slightly different way. You may have an expensive mountain bike you don’t wish to damage the paintwork on (although with this sport always expect some damage to your bike!) or be limited by the type of frame your bike has. Again you can ask people in the sports as many have tried a variety before settling on one type and I have written about the types we sell at K9 Trail Time here:

https://k9trailtime.wordpress.com/2014/11/18/bikejor-attachments-which-one-for-you/

A few other things to remember are:

Always be aware of keeping within a suitable environment and temperatures for bikejoring, your dog will potentially be working hard on the bike, so stick to nice grassy trails and tracks for their paws and don’t run your dog in high temperatures or high humidity

Be courteous to anyone you meet whilst out bikejoring, stop your dog and hold them back if you are unsure of their reaction to anything you come across

Wear a helmet and gloves yourself as a bare minimum of safety equipment, you won’t be much good to your dog with an injury!

Once you have done a bit of research and discovered a bit about what the sport involves, got your equipment and trained your voice commands, then the next step is to get out there and start having fun! Hopefully we’ll see you out on the trails at an event sometime soon…

Remember the sport of bikejor is primarily about fun! Keep it fun and safe for your dog at all times and don't be afraid to ask for advice.

Remember the sport of bikejor is primarily about fun! Keep it fun and safe for your dog at all times and don’t be afraid to ask for advice.

 

Race Review – October 2014

October was a slightly less busy month than I had originally anticipated at the beginning of the year, because I had intended on going to the ECF Grand Prix held in France. However due to Donnie’s illness and not being sure of his fitness to travel such a way for an event, I had decided just to bow out this year. There was plenty to keep us occupied on home soil though…

United Canine Sports Club Training Weekend, Hicks Lodge, Leicestershire, 4th & 5th October – The first weekend in October was dedicated to a training weekend organised by the United Canine Sports Club at the Hicks Lodge Cycle Centre in Leicestershire. We went along to help people who are new to the sports gain an insight into Canicross, Bikejor, Dog Scootering and Dryland Mushing. There were organised talks both days and an opportunity to run the dogs on the Saturday evening and early Sunday morning. The weather (yet again) was very warm for October and Saturday nights’ run was bordering on too warm but the temperatures dropped overnight and Sunday was almost frosty, dry and perfect for running the dogs round the dedicated mile loop. The event was, in my opinion, a great success, with lots of people coming away having learnt from those who have been participating in the sports for a number of years. I think we need more training weekends like this in the UK and was glad to have been part of two organised training weekends before the racing season really kicks in.

The training weekend was a great success and we had perfect weather on the Sunday morning for a proper run

The training weekend was a great success and we had perfect weather on the Sunday morning for a proper run

 

Hicks Lodge Dash, Leicestershire, 19th October 2014 – This one-off race was organised in conjunction with Canicross Midlands, who have really added to the 2014/2015 race calender with a race series and a couple of stand alone events, this being the first of the stand alone events. I know I keep going on about the weather but it was another warm day for dog racing and so I knew it was going to be another plod around for us. In spite of this I really enjoyed the route, as it took me on paths around this National Forest Park which I haven’t seen used in previous races we have attended here. Most of the paths are designed for easy wheelchair and pushchair access, however the race organisers took us off the beaten track a little and this made the course much more dog-friendly and interesting as a result.

Judo and I enjoyed our run but it was still much too warm for us to race - Photo courtesy of Soar Photo

Judo and I enjoyed our run but it was still much too warm for us to race – Photo courtesy of Soar Photo

Cotswold Canicross Training Runs, 11th, 15th, 25th & 31st October – At home for a couple of weekends, I took the opportunity to arrange some local group runs with Cotswold Canicross, the group I run when I get the chance! We are lucky to have some lovely trails close by and we are particularly fond of some routes around the Cotswold Water Park, which give plenty of natural water stops for the dogs. I find that participating in group runs gives my dogs a relaxed way to socialise and any novice dogs, new to canicross, seem to pick up the idea better when in a group. I really enjoy the local canicross runs and often wish I had more time to organise them but there just aren’t enough weekends in the year!

We enjoyed spending time with friends on our local canicross runs - Photo courtesy of Colin Roberts

We enjoyed spending time with friends on our local canicross runs – Photo courtesy of Colin Roberts

Doughnut Dash, 24th October – This was a challenge organised through Cotswold Canicross but mainly attended by Canicross Wiltshire participants. I found a fantastic little race which was held back a few weeks before in Colchester (more info here:

http://www.doughnutdash.org.uk/info/) in aid of Kidney Research UK. The organisers had some medals left over and so had set up a virtual event for people to take part in, all you had to do was arrange your own Doughnut Dash (run 5km eating a doughnut after every 1km before continuing) and document it with photo evidence. Needless to say this sounded like the challenge I was up for, so we picked a venue with a 1km lap to allow us to return back to the cars easily for the doughnuts. The dogs were all a bit bemused by the sight of us stuffing our faces with doughnuts and none for them! We completed the challenge, some more easily than others, and I’m glad we gave it a go as it was fun to do something a bit different but I won’t be eating doughnuts for a while now (maybe that’s a good thing!).

The Doughnut Dash was a funny little challenge for us but we hopefully raised some money for  the serious cause of charity Kidney Research UK

The Doughnut Dash was a funny little challenge for us but we hopefully raised some money for the serious cause of charity Kidney Research UK

So to conclude Octobers Race Review, I would say the warm weather held us back again in the one race we made it to, although I think the opportunity to do a bit more training and socialise wasn’t a bad thing. It’s really important sometimes to mix up the training that you do, so I think that by doing a few longer runs at home, building stamina, this will help the dogs (and me) when we finally get some weather cool enough to compete in.

Bikejor Attachments – Which one for you?

With so many people starting to take an interest in the sport of bikejoring and not knowing where to start with what to look for in a bikejor attachment, I thought I would write a quick blog to highlight the features of each of the attachments we sell here at K9 Trail Time.

The purpose of the attachment for bikejoring is only to help keep the line away from the wheel and the bungee lead you use to connect to your dogs’ harness must always be wrapped around the main headset on the frame of the bike. Never fix the line to the end of the attachment or to your handle bars. The attachments are not designed to take the weight of the dog pulling and if you attach your line to the handle bars you risk the dog pulling your bike in a different direction to the one you would like to be travelling in!

Arctic Wolf Attachment – Suitable for both bikes and scooters – Link to website:

http://www.k9trailtime.com/shop/bikejor-scootering/bikejor-attachments/bikejor-converter-arctic-wolf.html

This attachment is made of metal with a big rubber bungee providing the flexibility in it for unexpected stops. The Arctic Wolf attachment fixes around your bike’s headset with a clamp which is tightened with a spanner and provides a strong point for the arm to be fixed to your bike. The rubber joint and metal arm can be screwed and unscrewed, making the arm easily detachable if you leave the metal clamp on the bike. This attachment is great for keeping strong dogs directed towards the front of the bike, although it it the heaviest of the attachments and it ‘bounces’ slightly with the movement of your bike.

Arctic Wolf Bikejor Convertor

Arctic Wolf Bikejor Convertor

Non-stop Klick Fix Attachment – Suitable for both bikes and scooters – Link to website:

http://www.k9trailtime.com/shop/bikejor-scootering/bikejor-attachments/non-stop-bike-scooter-attachment.html

The Non-stop attachment uses the patented Klick Fix system for attaching the lightweight metal arm to the bike, making it the most expensive of the attachments we sell. The main unit has a very simple way of attaching to the handle bars of your bike, which also means it is the most universal of the attachments we sell. The metal arm then slides into the unit and is very easy to remove from the bike using the Klick Fix system but is also extremely tough when attached, so it is suitable for even the strongest of pulling dogs. The arm incorporates a rubber bungee for flexibility if your dog should stop suddenly but does not bounce like the other metal attachments tend to.

Non-stop Klick Fix Attachment

Non-stop Klick Fix Bike / Scooter Attachment

Rower-land Attachment – Suitable for bikes only – Link to website:

http://www.k9trailtime.com/shop/bikejor-scootering/bikejor-attachments/rowerland-bikejor-attachment.html

The Rower-land bikejor attachment fixes to the bike with velcro and webbing straps, which makes it very quick and easy to fit or remove the whole unit. Once it is strapped into place however, it doesn’t move at all and provides rigidity out the front of the bike to keep the line from dropping into the wheel. The attachment is make from a very strong plastic, which also has the benefit of being flexible enough to bend if your dog were to stop suddenly. This attachment will not fit on bikes that do not have a standard, slightly angled, mountain bike frame, so you will have to check it will work with your bike.

Rower-land Bike Attachment

Rower-land Bike Attachment

Windog Attachment – Suitable for both bikes and scooters – Link to website:

http://www.k9trailtime.com/shop/bikejor-scootering/bikejor-attachments/windog-bike-scooter-attachment.html

The Windog bike and scooter attachment is the most flexible of the attachments we sell and also the cheapest. It attaches using a very simple system of bolts and washers to fix to itself around the headset of your bike, meaning it will not mark your bike or scooter in any way. It has two different width settings but could also be adapted for thinner frames by using foam padding underneath. The Windog attachment is made of very pliable plastic covered in material, which gives maximum sideways movement to the attachment, whilst still holding you line away from the front wheel.

Windog Bike / Scooter Attachmnet

Windog Bike / Scooter Attachment

Hopefully you will find this short guide useful in making your choice but if you would like more information on any of the products we sell, please do get in touch through the website: http://www.k9trailtime.com

Happy trails!