K9 Trail Time Interview with an expert – Dr Jacqueline Boyd BSc (Hons), MSc, PhD, PGCHE, CHES, FHEA, MRSB

At K9 Trail Time we use a holistic approach for the health of our active dogs and so we think EVERYTHING should be taken into consideration when you want to keep your dog in tip top condition. A big part of this is feeding and nutrition, so who better to have on our expert panel than a bona fide canine nutritional expert! We hope you find our interview with Dr Jacqueline Boyd interesting and it gives you ‘food’ for thought!

Tell our followers a little bit about what you do, how you got into it, how long you have been doing it and your experience / or qualifications?

I’m currently (as of June this year!) the Nutritional Consultant for Skinner’s Pet Foods, although was a university lecturer in animal and equine science at Nottingham Trent University for the last 11 years. I graduated with my BSc (Hons) Zoology (Parasitology) in 1998 and moved into an MSc in Animal Nutrition, followed by a PhD in Genetics, specifically looking at aspects of development in hosts and parasites and how insulin signalling genes regulated this. Throughout my studies, I was deeply interested in how to manage animal health, welfare and performance and obviously nutrition is a key part of this. I’ve worked with pigs, dairy cattle, sheep, beef cattle in a practical and advisory nutrition role, as well as with laboratory animals in diet trials. My real interest is however in companion species, especially dogs and I have extensive practical experience in a range of canine disciplines, as well as my scientific background. I have cocker spaniels who keep me firmly grounded in reality and the practical applications of animal and nutrition science!

Jacqueline Boyd has years of nutrition experience with sporting dogs of all varieties

What does a day in the life of you consist of?

My job role is an exciting and varied one, albeit a new one! I undertake nutritional consults and provide advice and support to owners and customers – this is always fascinating and really interesting. Research, development, product review and keeping abreast of scientific developments is important too and I work with the marketing and customer support teams to disseminate knowledge and share information. This also involves attendance at key events we sponsor and have trade stands at. I’m also responsible for developing training material for our staff to ensure best and most current practice. So far, my job is varied, flexible and gives me an opportunity to use both my practical and theoretical knowledge to make the world a little better for dogs and their people

Share with us your proudest moment so far

From a career point of view, when I see the application of any information I have delivered/disseminated/taught or researched, that makes me proud but also massively humble! It’s great to hear positive reports from people based on advice given and also seeing students I have worked with move on to bigger things (many are now also working in nutrition!)

From a canine point of view, I’ve been lucky to have amazing dogs, but two key successes are – my first cocker spaniel, Megan got me to Crufts in 2007 as part of the Irish International Agility Pentathlon Team and one of my current spaniels, Molly won The Field magazine’s “Naughtiest Gundog” award last year!!

What are your top 3 tips connected with what you do for our followers and their active dogs?

  1. You ALWAYS take home the best dog – never forget that your dog is your buddy as well as your competitive partner 😊
  2. Feed according to fact, not fad! – Canine nutrition is a hot topic but just because something works for one person/dog, does not mean that it will work for you. Science is continually helping us make better dietary choices and developments that impact on health and welfare and being aware of this is key. Lots of factors impact on dietary choices for our dogs!
  3. You cannot manage what you do not monitor – whether this is weight, body condition score, exercise tolerance, food intake etc. As a scientist, monitoring biological characteristics is key to managing them, especially for our canine athletes.

What are your plans for the future?

I feel hugely privileged to be able to share and indulge my knowledge and passions in my job. My overall aim is to continue to try and make the world a better place for dogs and their owners by improving health, welfare and the human-dog bond. I also want to continue working my cocker spaniels in agility and in the field as gundogs and work towards my personal ambition of a homebred, dual Field Trial and Agility champion! I might never make it, but I intend to have a lot of fun trying!

Jacqueline has had great success competing with her own dogs

How can our followers get in touch with you?

I can be contacted at Skinner’s on jackieboyd@skinners.co.uk or in person at many agility events and or Game fairs where Skinner’s has a stand.

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K9 Trail Time Interview with an expert – Catherine Nicoll, Clinical Canine Massage Therapist

Our next professional to feature in the ‘Interview with an expert series’ is Catherine Nicoll, a Clinical Canine Massage Therapist, who we have been going to see to keep the dogs in tip top condition since she set up in 2012.

Canine massage has been something the K9 Trail Time dogs have had incorporated into our training programme for 6 years now

Tell our followers a little bit about what you do, how you got into it, how long you have been doing it and your experience / or qualifications?

I am a Clinical Canine Massage Therapist so I specialise in treating soft tissue, muscular issues such as lameness/limping and dogs with Orthopaedic conditions like hip dysplasia and Arthritis. I also treat dogs post operation like Cruciate Ligament or Luxating Patella. I do 4 disciplines of massage to include Swedish, Sports Massage which is used for injury identification, isolating muscles by working from origin to insertion and I focus on trigger point release and scar tissue remodelling. I also do deep tissue massage which mobilises the deeper muscles, spreading fibres to make the muscles more supple and flexible. Finally, I do Myofascial Release. Muscles need to be able to slide and glide and myofascial release releases muscles from each other and from the periosteum of the bone. I treat elderly dogs who are slowing down and getting stiff as well as sporting dogs who have either injured themselves with sprains or strains or for maintenance to keep their muscles in good working order. I completed the Diploma in Canine Massage Therapy in January 2012 and set up my business, Dogs Body Canine Massage Therapy, immediately after.

Catherine treats many dogs besides sports dogs, as all dogs can benefit from massage

The reason I got into massage is that I am a qualified human sports massage therapist and, having regular massage myself, knew how beneficial it was. My dog, Paddy, kept going lame when he was 15 months old and after x-rays and further investigation I was told by the vet that they couldn’t find any issues and so I would need to just keep him on lead walks. I looked into having him massaged and when I took him to Natalie Lenton from The Canine Massage Therapy Centre, she found the problem with his lameness immediately. He had a strain (tear to his muscle) in his superficial pectoral muscle which was making him lame. I was so impressed and relieved to know what the problem was that I decided to sign up for the course. The course took me 18 months to complete and I left my job of 20 years working in a bank to set up my own business.

What does a day in the life of you consist of?

My day varies. I am lucky that my Clinic is at my home so in between treatments I can be with my own dogs. I have treated up to 8 dogs in one day but ideally prefer to treat 4-5 dogs a day. As well as doing Clinical Canine Massage Therapy, I am also a Tutor on The Clinical Canine Massage Practitioner Programme run by The Canine Massage Therapy Centre and so my days are sometimes taken up with tutor work in preparation for the students. Being self-employed means that I can choose to take an impromptu day off when I like which I love! I also run 1-day workshops for members of the public to enable them to learn some Swedish massage techniques to do on their own dog at home. (Details on my website).

Dogs tend to relax into the massage and benefits begin to be seen after a session or two

Share with us your proudest moment so far

Every day that I am helping dogs makes me proud. I guess if I had to choose one, however, it would be changing one elderly dog’s life completely. His owner was thinking about having him put to sleep as he could hardly walk and was miserable but decided to try massage as a last resort. After 2 sessions he was happier, more mobile and enjoying his walks. He went on to live for another 3 years.

What are your top 3 tips connected with what you do for our followers and their active dogs?

  1. If you have laminated/wood flooring put non-slip runners down! Dogs are digit grade animals which means they walk on their toes. They cannot grip hard floors and so end up slipping around which puts a lot of strain on their muscles and inevitably end up getting injured.
  2. Get your dog check out by a Canine Massage Guild member. We are trained to identify muscular issues so by bringing them for a massage 2-3 times a year it enables us Therapists to spot any issues before they become a problem. We work “best practice” and so, if your dog is injured you should see an improvement in 1-3 sessions. In the unlikely event that you don’t, we would cease further treatment and refer your dog back to the vet for further investigation.
  3. Dogs get injured the same as humans do, think about what you are doing with your dog. Don’t keep using ball launchers to exercise your dog. Warm them up on lead for 10 minutes before letting them off to run. Feed them a good diet and don’t let them get fat! Give them a day off from exercise. Mental stimulation is just as important as physical. Don’t feel guilty if you are unable to take your dog for a walk one day, it’s not going to do them any harm and the rest will give their body time to recover.

Catherine will be continuing to help owners and their dogs but also by training other therapists, bring the benefit of massage to many more dog owners

What are your plans for the future?

I am passionate about what I do and so I just want to keep on helping dogs with mobility issues and make a difference to their lives. I will keep on learning more about canine anatomy and physiology as I find it fascinating. I want to continue to educate dog owners on the benefits of Clinical Canine Massage Therapy as there are still people out there who have never heard of it, although that has improved in the years since I trained!

 

How can our followers get in touch with you?

You can visit my website www.dogsbodycaninemassage.co.uk you can email me at mail@dogsbodycaninemassage.co.uk or ring me on 07967 099603. I am based in Hartpury, Gloucestershire. I have a Facebook page too so please go in and “like” my page – https://www.facebook.com/DogsBodyCMT/  

If I am not local to you, then visit The Canine Massage Guild website and find your local therapist there. http://www.k9-massageguild.co.uk

K9 Trail Time A-Z of Canicross – J is for Jacket

This time of year as the weather is getting cooler, it seems appropriate to mention the ‘J’ word – Jacket. I know I am now back in my lightweight running jacket as the temperatures have dropped and sometimes we need to consider the same for our dogs. Any time you go running with your dog you will be assessing the weather and if you have a hairy dog breed, you will just be relieved that you don’t have to worry so much about them overheating as winter approaches. But if you have a breed with very little hair then you might have the opposite problem and need to be aware of how quickly your dog can get cold, particularly when it’s wet. At K9 Trail Time we stock a number of different jackets for dogs, ranging from a cool coat to help your dog cope with the heat, to the winter coats, which they can wear during or after exercise. We also stock life jackets which are very useful for keeping your dog safe if you do any swimming. Anything we don’t have in stock we can usually order to be delivered within about a week. So although not essential for every dog, we felt it important enough to make ‘Jacket’ our ‘J’ in the A-Z of Canicross.

Dog jackets are a useful tool to keep your dog warm and dry or even cool and afloat, during the changing seasons and any activities you might be doing with them

Dog jackets are a useful tool to keep your dog warm and dry or even cool and afloat, during the changing seasons and any activities you might be doing with them