Triathlon for dogs comes to the UK

Triathlon for dogs isn’t something that had been done before Tri Dog set up in the UK in 2016, probably because we have a climate which makes it very difficult to get the timing right for all three disciplines to be participated in at the same event. Traditionally the running and cycling elements of a triathlon are winter sports when dogs are involved, so that the dogs are running in cooler temperatures and are not likely to overheat. Of course this doesn’t relate so well to the open water swimming element and it is something we have considered at great length and have chosen our dates according to balancing these factors.

Choosing the right time of year for the Tri Dog events has been very important

The group of people behind Tri Dog events in the UK have all had a wealth of competitive experience with running and cycling dogs but the swimming is something we have only been doing to maintain fitness in the summer. We have taken inspiration from a competition which has been running in Europe for 8 consecutive years now called ‘Iron Dog’ and using their model we have begun to offer a programme of training and events to develop triathlon for dogs in the UK, mainly based around the Midlands area.

The main elements of a Tri Dog event are:

Canicross:

Running with dogs is now more commonly known as canicross and is defined as cross country running with your dog attached to you. To take part in canicross races, your dog must have a correctly fitting harness and be attached via a bungee lead to a waistbelt worn by the person. Canicross is a fast growing sport in the UK and there have been specific races for people to take part in with their dogs for over 10 years now.

Canicross – running with your dog

Bikejor:

Biking with dogs is known as bikejoring and although originates from the sled dog sports where people used bikes to keep their dogs fit in the spring and autumn when there was no snow for sledding, is now a sport in it’s own right. Riders usually have a mountain bike with an attachment which helps to keep the bungee line from falling in the wheel if the dog stops suddenly and the dog is in harness, attached to the bike via a bungee lead around the headstock of the bike. Bikejor is much faster than canicross and the top dog and rider combinations are reaching speeds of in excess of 30 mph on some of the trails.

Bikejor – biking with your dog

Swimming:

Swimming with dogs hasn’t got a specific name and isn’t yet a recognised sport. For the Tri Dog events being brought to the UK we are requesting that your dog is attached to you via a lead of some description for safety. The idea is to try and get your dog to either swim alongside you in the open water or if you’ve got a really strong swimmer, they can even pull you if they are wearing a comfortable harness.

Swimming with your dog

The Tri Dog series of training and events got underway in October 2016 with the first training weekend which sold out before the event. We welcomed a group of owners and their dogs along to Croft Farm, near Tewkesbury to come and participate in all three disciplines and also practice some vital race skills.

The bikejor group concentrated on bike skills for the people and then once some basic skills were established and practiced, the dogs were brought into the training sessions. Depending on previous experience, some people were tackling a specially designed skills trail and some were getting confidence with their dog being attached to the bike and running out in front.

The canicross group focused on the skills necessary for racing in a triathlon, this is very important when it comes to racing with dogs as you are responsible for your dogs’ behaviour as well as your own! Canicrossers were passing each other side by side and then progressing to head on passes encouraging the dogs to ignore each other and stay calm. Race starts were also practiced and the transitions were explained and then completed by all those taking part. We are using stake out lines to attach the dogs to whilst the owner changes the equipment for each phase, this enables the dog to see the owner at all times but not interfere with any other dog or person, keeping everyone involved separate and safe.

The swimming group worked on getting the dogs confidently into the water and for some this was the first time they had experienced open water swimming with their dogs, so making the process as calm and enjoyable as possible was vital to ensure the dogs (and their owners) would be happy to do this again. For the swimming element of the triathlon, the welfare of the dogs is paramount and we do not encourage owners to force their dogs to swim, with this in mind there is a wade option for those whose dogs are struggling with the swim.

The swim is the part most people worry about

The training weekend was a resounding success and we have already had calls for more training sessions which we are hoping to provide in 2019. We have our next Triathlon event in less than two week now with the biggest entry we’ve seen since we began the events, so it looks like it will be a good one!

If you would like to know more about Tri Dog and for the event and training information please visit the Facebook page Tri Dog and our website http://www.tri-dog.com, we’d love to get more people participating and enjoying this very new combination of dog sports with their beloved pets.

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Tri Dog – The first UK Triathlon with Dogs

In 2017 the Tri Dog events committee (made up of recreational, national and international athletes) organised the very first triathlon with dogs in the UK. As individuals we all wanted to be involved in running events and do something for the dog sports community, but there are so many organisations doing such a good job of the standard canicross and bikejor events, we wanted to do something a bit different.
The aim of Tri Dog was to arrange a 3 stage event where participants swim with their dogs, then exit the water and transition onto the bike to complete an off road bike course, then transition to the trail running section to finish the triathlon. To explain a little bit more about how this works with dogs we’ve divided the triathlon into the three disciplines.
Swimming:
Swimming with dogs hasn’t got a specific name and isn’t yet a recognised sport, there are however a number of groups beginning to hold Canine SUP and swimming sessions across the UK. For our Tri Dog events we request that your dog is attached to you via a lead of some description for safety. The idea is to try and get your dog to either swim alongside you in the open water or if you’ve got a really strong swimmer, they can even pull you if they are wearing a comfortable harness.

Swimming with your dog – Photo courtesy of John Boulton

Bikejor:
Biking with dogs is known as bikejoring and although originates from the sled dog sports where people used bikes to keep their dogs fit in the spring and autumn when there was no snow for sledding, is now a sport in it’s own right. Riders usually have a mountain bike with an attachment which helps to keep the bungee line from falling in the wheel if the dog stops suddenly and the dog is in harness, attached to the bike via a bungee lead around the headstock of the bike. Bikejor is much faster than canicross and the top dog and rider combinations are reaching speeds of in excess of 30 mph on some of the trails.

You can bike or scooter with your dogs for the wheeled stage but most chose to bike – Photo courtesy of John Boulton

Canicross:
Running with dogs is now more commonly known as canicross and is defined as cross country running with your dog attached to you. To take part in canicross races, your dog must have a correctly fitting harness and be attached via a bungee lead to a waistbelt worn by the person. Canicross is the fastest growing sport of the 3 in the UK and there have been specific races for people to take part in with their dogs for over 10 years now.

Canicross is a rapidly growing sport in the UK – Photo courtesy of Take 2 Event Photos

The Tri Dog series of training and events got underway at the beginning of October 2016 with our first training weekend, we then went on to hold a duathlon in January 2017 to practice the transitions and ensure we could run the event safely with numerous dogs in one area. The training and duathlon went without a hitch, so it was full steam at the end of April for our first dog triathlon!
We chose to host the event at Box End Park near Milton Keynes because we’ve attended events there before and the site was perfect for everything we needed, with two separate transition areas, one at each end of the park. We wanted plenty of space for everyone so no one felt pressured to transition quicker than they wanted to, the aim was to keep everything very calm for the dogs and we think we achieved this.

We kept our transition area calm for the dogs at both the duathlon and triathlon – Photo courtesy of Take 2 Event Photos

The other big consideration we had was what time of year we held the event as the water temperature needed to be warm enough for the human and dog combinations to complete the 70 metre swim comfortably but also cool enough for the dogs for the bikejor and canicross sections. We had many a discussion about this and decided the end of April and end of September were probably our best bets and that certainly seemed to be the case for our first triathlon.
We had in excess of 60 entries over the weekend, made up of individuals completing the triathlon or a duathlon which we also ran after the main triathlon. We also allowed people to put together teams so they could relay the 3 stages if they wanted to, so everybody who wanted to come and have a go at the event could enter something they felt comfortable with completing.
The best part of the weekend for us as organisers was to see the real look of achievement as people crossed the finish lines with their dogs and received their competitors medal. The triathlon was a real test of people’s bond with their dog as it takes quite a lot of trust and training to be able to swim, bike and run with your dog. Not to mention the fact that although the distances were kept short (70 metres for the swim, 2.5 km for the bike and 2.5 km for the run) you needed to have a decent level of fitness to be able to race in all 3 disciplines, one after the other. At every stage we saw participants working with their dogs and it was evident who had done the most training from the dogs’ trust in their owner to guide them through the event from start to finish, competing in a race they would never have experienced before.

Competitors had a real sense of achievement after completing the event – Photo courtesy of John Boulton

We are pleased to say the September event also had a great response and we managed to increase our numbers slightly and had some great feedback from both events. We are looking forward to hosting the next Tri Dog triathlon at the beginning of May at Box End Park again. We have learnt valuable lessons about timings, numbers and general administration of the event, so we are confident we can improve on the 2017 events and give people an even better experience of triathlon with dogs at the next one.
To find out more about the events please visit our Facebook page www.facebook.com/TriDogUK/, where will be beginning to post updates and information about the next event soon or visit our website: http://www.tri-dog.com/
We look forward to seeing more people entering and completing their first triathlon with their dog with us in 2018!

K9 Trail Time A-Z of Canicross – S is for Sport

We’re still working our way through the A-Z of Canicross and so now we’re at ‘S’ we can’t ignore the fact that canicross is a recognised sport, with it’s own races and even different championship series taking place all over the UK, Europe and the world. Canicross was also recently added to the Kennel Club listed activities, although we would suggest going to one of the more experienced clubs and organisations who have actually been involved in the sport for over 10 years if you’re looking for up to date information and advice. One such organisation is CaniX http://www.canix.co.uk who set up the first race series specifically for canicross in the UK and are still holding events all over the country today. Another of the largest clubs who organise races and who offer training, advice, and kit to try, is the Canicross Midlands group http://www.canicrossmidlands.co.uk/. Although canicross is now known as a sport, CaniX and Canicross Midlands have always encouraged people to run with their own pets and to just enjoy the bond you can create with your dog through running together. As the sport has developed many people are beginning to take the racing side of canicross more seriously and have invested in purpose bred dogs (mainly originating in Europe) to compete in higher level races such as those organised by the BSSF (British Sleddog Sport Federation) and the IFSS (International Federation for Sleddog Sports). However, whilst these dogs are beautiful athletes, there is no need for you to change from your pet dog to enjoy canicrossing with your four legged friend and we would suggest that the most fun you can have is in seeing your dog simply enjoying activity with you, keeping you both fit and healthy. Our slogan is after all, active dogs are happy dogs, and so for ‘S’ in our A-Z of Canicross we have chosen to highlight the fact that canicross is a sport that anyone with a dog can enjoy!

Although canicross is a sport with it’s own races, it is also something that can be enjoyed by anyone with their pet dog – Photo courtesy of Dylan Trollope

K9 Trail Time A-Z of Canicross – O is for Obesity

We all know that there are two main ways to stay fit and healthy, firstly by eating the right diet and secondly by getting out and exercising. In the UK alone it is predicted that by 2020 as many as one third of the adult population will be classified as obese. The same can be said about the UK’s dog population. Recent studies estimate that up to one third of dogs nationwide are already overweight and this figure is set to rise to over half of all dogs by 2022. Obesity is linked with diabetes, orthopaedic disease, heart disease, respiratory distress, high blood pressure, skin diseases & cancer in both dogs and people, so this alone is a very good reason to be getting out and about canicrossing with your dog. A recent PDSA report estimates that across the country, six million dogs go for a daily walk shorter than an hour long, and a quarter of a million dogs don’t get walked at all. With these statistics it’s easy to see why we need to find a way to encourage people to exercise themselves and their dogs, and who can think of a better personal trainer than their dog?! At K9 Trail Time we are trying to make it as easy as possible for you to get into canicross too, by providing you with loads of information, including links to local clubs and national events we know about, as well as offering advice and help to anyone who asks for it. So if you are thinking you would like to find a fun way to combat obesity for both yourself and your dog, look no further, canicross is the perfect way to keep trim, whilst having fun and doing something you’ll both benefit from mentally and physically. For that reason we have chosen obesity, or rather, a way to combat it, as our ‘O’ in the A-Z of canicross.

Canicross with your best friend is a fantastic way for both of you to stay fit

Canicross with your best friend is a fantastic way for both of you to stay fit

Product Feature – The Neewa Canicross Belt

The Neewa Canicross Belt is the newest addition to our ever-expanding range of waist belts for canicrossers. The belts are known as waist belts but now I would say the term ‘hip belt’ is probably more accurate and I would always advise anyone using a belt for running with your dog, to adjust it low down the body on the hips. The Neewa Canicross Belt’s lightweight design lends itself to this position because the mesh of the belt supports the runners bottom and the top of the belt clips around the hips rather than the waist.

The Neewa Canicross Belt is the newest of our 'hip belts'

The Neewa Canicross Belt is the newest of our ‘hip belts’

The belt has integrated leg straps which (together with the strap that clips around the hips) keeps the belt in place when running and prevents unwanted movement. The Neewa Canicross Belt has a small pocket in the mesh at the back of the belt, large enough for keys and a few poo bags but nothing more. The belt also feature a metal ring which slides along the webbing strap in front of the runners hips to attach your dog’s line to. You can either just loop the webbing handle of a line through on itself, through this ring, or use an additional carabiner to attach the line.

The Neewa Canicross Belt being tested earlier this year

The Neewa Canicross Belt being tested earlier this year

The main advantages of this belt are that it is lightweight, adjustable to fit most sizes and has the sliding ring on the front to attach your dog to, which I am a big fan of. The Neewa Canicross belt is also very good value for money and that makes it a great starter belt, as well as one for the more experienced canicrosser. The only disadvantage I can see with the belt is that it’s style might not suit everyone, it does sit low down on the body with minimal material and this might not appeal to every canicrosser. On the whole though, this belt comes highly recommended by us for every day use and for racing with one or more dogs, it has been tested with three enthusiastic collie crosses and passed with flying colours!

For more information or to buy this belt please follow this link:

http://www.k9trailtime.com/shop/neewa-canicross-waist-belt.html

 

The new Neewa Canicross Belt is an excellent all round belt at a great price

The new Neewa Canicross Belt is an excellent all round canicross belt at a great price